PA – Patience Signing

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Daniel Clowes appears at the Parkway Central Library in conversation with Sam Briger on Thursday, March 3, 2016 at 7:30 PM to speak about his new graphic novel PATIENCE!

Press Release:

Celebrated graphic novelist and Academy Award-nominated screenwriter Daniel Clowes is the multiple Harvey, Ignatz, and Eisner Award-winning creator of the alternative comic Eightball. His graphic novel Ghost World was adapted into an acclaimed film directed by Terry Zwigoff and starring Thora Birch. Called “the country’s premier underground cartoonist” (Newsweek) and “a bona-fide cult hero” (The New Yorker), he is a frequent cover artist for The New Yorker. His new graphic novel is a psychedelic science-fiction love story, veering from violent destruction to deeply personal tenderness.

Free Library of Philadelphia – Parkway Central Library
1901 Vine Street, Philadelphia, PA 19103
215-686-5322

ID – Roz Chast Speaks

0000-roz-chastCartoonist Roz Chast speaks at the Egyptian Theatre on Thursday February 4, 2016 at 7:30 PM! Tickets available now…

Roz Chast is a staff cartoonist for The New Yorker and the author of several books including Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant? which was a finalist for the National Book Award. Her cartoons have also been published in other magazines, including Scientific American, the Harvard Business Review, Redbook, and Mother Jones. She attended Rhode Island School of Design, holds honorary doctorates from Pratt Institute and Dartmouth College, and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

The Egyptian Theatre
700 W. Main St. Boise, ID 83705

CA – Roz Chast Speaks

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Cartoonist Roz Chast speaks on Sunday, January 31, 2016 at 4:00 PM at UCLA.

Roz Chast has loved drawing cartoons since she was a child growing up in Brooklyn. She attended Rhode Island School of Design, majoring in painting because it seemed more artistic. However, soon after graduating, she reverted to type and began drawing cartoons once again. Chast is now known as a brilliant interpreter of the everyday. Her cartoons depict neuroses, hilarity, angst and domesticity and are loaded with words, objects and patterns. More than 1,000 of them have been printed in The New Yorker since 1978.

In this performance, she will read from her first memoir which harnesses her signature wit as she recounts her experience caring for her aging parents. Spanning the last several years of their lives and told through four-color cartoons, family photos and documents, and a narrative as rife with laughs as it is with tears, Chast’s memoir is both comfort and comic relief for anyone experiencing the life-altering loss of elderly parents. The evening will showcase the full range of Chast’s talent as cartoonist and storyteller.

Tickets available at the link…

University of California, Los Angeles – Royce Hall
340 Royce Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90095

CA – An Evening with Roz Chast

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Cartoonist Roz Chast speaks on Friday, January 29, 2016 at 7:00 PM and Saturday, January 30, 2016 at 2:00 PM at the Newport Beach Public Library Foundation.

A humorous and poignant book that chronicles her relationship with her aging parents as they shift from independence to dependence, Can’t We Talk about Something More Pleasant? is the latest book for adults by Roz Chast. Using handwritten text, drawings, photographs, and her keen eye for the foibles that make us human, Chast addresses the realities of what it is to get old in America today – and what it is to have aging parents today – with tenderness and candor, and a good dose of her characteristic wit.

Can’t We Talk about Something More Pleasant is a New York Times 2014 Top Ten Best Book of the Year, 2014 National Book Award Finalist, the winner of the 2014 Kirkus Prize, and a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle awards for the best books of 2014.

Tickets are available at the link…

Newport Beach Public Library Foundation
1000 Avocado Ave, Newport Beach, CA 92660
(949) 717-3800

ID – Roz Chast Speaks

0000-roz-chastCartoonist Roz Chast speaks on Thursday, January 21, 2016 at 6:30 PM at the Presbyterian Church of the Big Wood.

Roz Chast is a brilliant interpreter of the everyday. Her cartoons depict neuroses, hilarity, angst and domesticity and are loaded with words, objects and patterns. More than 1000 of them have been printed in The New Yorker since 1978. Chast has written and illustrated books for both children and adults. Her newest book for adults is Can’t We Talk about Something More Pleasant?, a graphic memoir that chronicles her relationship with her aging parents as they shift from independence to dependence.

RSVP on Facebook!

Presbyterian Church of the Big Wood
100 Saddle Road | PO Box 660, Ketchum, ID 83340

NY – Roz Chast Speaks

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Cartoonist Roz Chast is a brilliant interpreter of the everyday. Her cartoons depict neuroses, hilarity, angst and domesticity and are loaded with words, objects and patterns. More than 1000 of them have been printed in The New Yorker since 1978. Join us in a moderated conversation on Thursday, December 3, 2015 at 8:00 PM with audience Q&A and a book signing to follow. VIP Includes a reception. Tickets available at the link…

NYCB Theatre at Westbury
960 Brush Hollow Rd, Westbury, NY 11590
(516) 247-5200

PA – Very Semi-Serious Screening

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Cartoonist Roz Chast appears at the Gershman Y on Saturday, November 14, 2015 at 7:30 PM as part of the Philadelphia Jewish Film Festival for a screening of the film “Very Semi-Serious” followed by Q&A and book signing. Tickets available at the link…

Press Release:

VERY SEMI-SERIOUS provides a humorous and illuminating window into the quirky and endearing world of The New Yorker’s iconic single-panel cartoons. While the documentary’s chief subject is the magazine’s cartoon gatekeeper, Editor Robert Mankoff, a charming and affable character whose engaging story could easily take up an entire film, first-time filmmaker Leah Wolchok takes care to highlight some of The New Yorker’s other freelance cartoonists – an awesomely eccentric mix of crusty vets and newbies, young and old, male and female. Featuring interviews with notables like Roz Chast, Mort Gerberg, Emily Flake, and George Booth, and newcomers the likes of Ed Steed and Liana Finch, Wolchok hones in on what inspires each to run Mankoff’s gauntlet of rejection week after week in hopes of making the cut.

The Gershman Y
401 Broad St, Philadelphia, PA 19147
(215) 545-4400

MI – An Evening With Roz Chast

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Cartoonist Roz Chast appears at Washtenaw Community College on Thursday, October 22nd at 7:00 PM!

Roz Chast has been drawing cartoons for the New Yorker since 1978 and is the author of several books including her recent award-winning graphic novel, Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant? The book gives a frank, funny account of her experience caring for her parents as they shift from independence to dependence.

This event is free and open to the public, seating is on a first come, first-served basis.

RSVP on Facebook!

Washtenaw Community College – Morris Lawrence Building
4800 E Huron River Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48105

DC – Roz Chast Signs

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Cartoonist Roz Chast appears at Politics & Prose to sign her new collection Can’t We Talk about Something More Pleasant? on Tuesday May 13, 2014 at 7:00 pm!

While her style is inimitably her own, Chast’s story of aging parents will resonate with many. In four-color cartoon panels, photos, and text, Chast, a New Yorker contributor since 1978 and the author/illustrator of a dozen books, recounts her life with a needy father and strong-willed mother and faces their mental and physical deterioration with wit and honesty.

Politics & Prose
5015 Connecticut Ave NW, Washington, DC 20008

NYC – Art Spiegelman’s Co-Mix: A Retrospective

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Layout 1Press Release:

Art Spiegelman’s Co-Mix: A Retrospective celebrates the career of one of the most influential living comic artists. Best known for Maus, his Pulitzer prize-winning graphic novel about his parents’ survival of the Holocaust, Art Spiegelman (b. 1948) has produced a diverse body of work over the course of five decades that has blurred the boundaries between “high” and “low” art. This first U.S. retrospective spans Spiegelman’s career: from his early days in underground “comix” to the thirteen-year genesis of Maus, to more recent work including his provocative covers for The New Yorker, and artistic collaborations in new and unexpected media. The exhibition highlights Spiegelman’s painstaking creative process, and includes over three hundred preparatory sketches, preliminary and final drawings, as well as prints and other ephemeral and documentary material.

Spiegelman first made a name for himself as an artist and editor in underground comix, the graphic expression of the counterculture of the 1960s and 1970s. As he matured as an artist, Spiegelman diverged from the sex and drug ethos of his peers and, in a postmodern fashion, increasingly challenged the narrative, visual, and structural possibilities of comics. He also began exploring themes that dominate his work to this day: intimate personal expression, memory, and history. In the 1980’s Spiegelman reinvigorated underground comics by co-founding the avant-garde magazine RAW with his wife Françoise Mouly. RAW showcased the most groundbreaking graphic artists of the time, as well as serially publishing chapters of the then work-in-progress Maus.

Maus recounted his parents’ life in Nazi-occupied Poland and at Auschwitz, as well as Spiegelman’s own complex relationship with his father Vladek. Eventually published in two volumes (in 1986 and 1991 respectively) by Pantheon, Maus was the first of its kind in content and format: the unique structure of the comics medium allowed the artist to navigate time and memory beyond the limitations of prose, creating a rich narrative that exploded the boundaries of comics and nonfiction.

Refusing to be defined by the overwhelming attention brought by this singular work, Spiegelman largely turned away from autobiography in the 1990s, instead writing and drawing for The New Yorker and other publications, and creating a series of children’s books. But after witnessing firsthand the collapse of the Twin Towers on 9/11, he returned to personal narrative with his autobiographical account In the Shadow of No Towers (2004). This lifelong concern with memory and personal experience has continued in his short comic memoir Portrait of the Artist as a Young %@*&! (2008), and in Metamaus (2011), a meditation on his creative process and career.

A self-proclaimed “stylistic switch-hitter,” Spiegelman’s versatility and encyclopedic knowledge of comics history has allowed him to adapt his visual language to many contexts and audiences. For those most familiar with Maus, this retrospective exhibition will be revelatory— from his early formal experiments, to his honest self-exposés, to his provocative illustrations and comic essays, visitors will gain an intimate look at an artist who continuously pushes himself and his art to the edge. The exhibition will also explore his artistic collaborations in new and unexpected media, including a performance with the dance troupe Pilobolus. – See more at the link!

The Jewish Museum
1109 5th Ave (at 92nd St) New York NY 10128

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