DragonCon 2017 Report (Including Interview with Jai Nitz)!

Before I saw Suicide Squad, I knew nothing about Chato Santana, who is the alter ego of El Diablo, the pyrokinetic gangbanger from East LA. After seeing the movie, he quickly became my favorite comic book character and one of my all time favorite characters in any medium. The reason I personally enjoy him is because he’s relatable. Everyone has their own regrets and every person wishes they could redeem themselves for something they’ve done in their past. Deadshot, Captain Boomerang, and Harley Quinn all seem to revel in their villainy, while Chato seems reluctant to even talk about it. He thinks of himself as a monster and attempts to control himself which is a direct contrast to, say, Harley’s defense of stealing from a department store: “We’re bad guys, it’s what we do.”

So, I was stoked when I realized that Jai Nitz, the creator of my anti-hero, would be at the very convention I was reporting on. This was my second year at DragonCon, and any of my loyal readers (thanks mom and dad!) would remember that last year I accidentally interviewed Nolan North, the voice of Deadpool and Desmond Miles from Assassin’s Creed. This year, however, I got an agreed interview that wasn’t illegal! Jai Nitz is what anyone would imagine the creator of a Latino Robin Hood would be… badass, intelligent, willing to sell all his stuff for $100. (These are all jokes, please don’t sue me). Reader beware, spoilers and ruined headcanons await!

How did you come up with the idea of Chato?

Chato is not a real name, it actually means butch, thick, beefy. The idea is that he would have had a real name at some point, it would have been Jaime or Guadalupe or something. He was always a big guy, so everyone would call him Chato. That was after my dad. They called my dad butch because there were seven kids in his grade with the same name as him. Everyone was called a nickname instead of just “Jerry.” That was kind of a nod to my dad, and the idea of who Chato was came from my cousin, Jaime. He’s my age, growing up close to the border in a culture that is 95% Hispanic. Drugs and human trafficking are not a thing on the news, they are a way of life. There are people who are dealing drugs and moving humans. They are not villains, they are Robin Hoods. They are sticking it to the man, instead of doing this nefarious, horrible crime to be on television, that’s not who they are. Not that my cousin is doing that, but I saw him in a situation where he was dealing with a lot of different stuff than I did. What would I have been if I had been in the same situation? In East Los Angeles where Chato was from, it is very much the same thing. There are neighborhoods that are closed off to the police because in 1992 only 10% of the Los Angeles police force was Latino. Today it’s 60%. Then, no one spoke Spanish. No one knew what to do if you got stuck in a Spanish speaking neighborhood. David Ayer, the director of Suicide Squad, his movie, End of Watch, is about a lot of that. It’s a lot about dealing with a culture that is alien to your own, and in the original El Diablo series, he was a gang lord. He was the Robin Hood of his neighborhood. He was the guy you would go to if you had a local problem that the police wouldn’t help you with. It was trying to show that just because you commit crimes doesn’t make you a bad guy, and just because you do bad stuff doesn’t make you a villain, and just because you save people doesn’t make you a hero. It was very much blurring the lines and I don’t think anybody was ready for that when I wrote it.

I think I fell in love with him when I first saw him.

If you meet Jay [Hernandez, actor for Chato in Suicide Squad] in real life, you will fall in love again because he is stupid good-looking.

How did you get your start in comics?

I got my start by self-publishing right out of college. As a new writer, the best way to make it in comics was to make your own comics. So I wrote my own comics and I found artists to work with. That was on the creative side, then you had to put on your business hat and you had to learn to make the files available to a printer, how to send them to be scanned by a scanning place because you didn’t have a scanner big enough, how to get those books printed and distributed, how to take them to conventions and sell them. Then that was my business card. I handed that out and said “please hire me.” It’s much easier for an editor to read a comic book than it is to read an idea on a piece of paper. Then once they trust you, they will read your ideas, but not until they believe in you as a writer. The best way to make them believe in you as a writer is to show something that you’ve written. If you want to write a comic book then write a comic book to hand out. So that’s what I did and I did it every couple of years until I finally started getting regular work. After about eleven years of trying, self-publishing, doing independant stuff, I got enough work at big publishers to go full-time freelance.

Did El Diablo actually die at the end of the movie?

He can’t die. HE CAN’T DIE! His powers dictate that the devil that possesses him. This is explained in the first series, and in the new series it is explained that, every time he dies, the devil just brings him back and takes more of his soul, so he gets more evil each time he dies. I was explaining this to David Ayer at the premiere of the movie. We were walking out of the movie, and he said, “How do we bring him back?” and I said, “You don’t have to. He can’t die. Every time he dies, the devil takes more of his soul and brings him back, so he comes back more evil, so if people like him in this movie, the next time he comes back, he’ll be worse, and the next time he comes back, he’ll be even worse. In your movie continuity, he says, ‘I was born with the devil’s gift,’ and the idea is that he was stillborn and the devil took him then, and every time he has died since then, the devil has taken more of his soul as he has brought him back every time.’”

If he drinks alcohol, will he just explode?

Not at all. His powers are magical in nature, which is the other reason you can just bring him back, because there is no science in how he throws fire, just as there is no science in how [Captain Boomerang] throws a boomerang, there is no science in how [Slipknot] uses ropes to climb stuff, there is no science in how [Deadshot] is the best shot in the world. He is made of demonic magical fire.

The reason I ask is because there is a deleted scene in the bar where Harley asks everyone what they want, he says, “Water,” and she says, “That’s a good idea, honey.”

That was definitely a great character moment. That was that character recognizing, “Me losing control is not good for anybody.” Because he knows what’s inside him, even though no one else does. The other thing is, it’s not really in the movie universe, but it would be the kind of thing I would explore. Nobody really believes him. Nobody really believes that there is a devil inside him. There are people who can fly, there are people who dress up like bats, there are people with magic power rings, but nobody believes he is possessed, and then you see it, and it’s a different animal.

I like how, in the movie, the other characters are afraid of him.

There’s a lot of really good subtle storytelling in the film that gets lost. They had re-shoots, and they had to change this, and they had to move scenes around, and stuff like that, to where there is some stuff that makes no sense. I’ve seen the movie so many times it isn’t funny. But then there is some stuff that is subtle like that, where even Deadshot realizes, this guy could kill us aaaaaaall. And nobody pays attention until it comes to that.

What are you working on next?

I’m working on a book called Suicide Squad Black that has El Diablo as the leader of a Suicide Squad team. It was supposed to come out last month, but it’s been delayed, so hopefully it will come out in 2018.

 

Going into this interview, I was expecting just to talk about comics, not to get a lecture on race relations and the social economics of East Los Angeles. But I’m glad Jai discussed those topics. I admire how he puts his background in his work. It helps him maintain his passion, which was evident when I talked to him.

And I’m definitely buying Suicide Squad Black when it comes out. Who’s with me?

 

Jai with a really cool El Diablo cosplayer

 

Cover of El Diablo #1 (2008)

DragonCon 2017 Report!

Each year, I start checking the guest list on the DragonCon web site in December. Call it my Christmas tradition. I check it once a month until, say, May, then once a week until summer’s midpoint. After that, I’m checking it pretty much daily until that pre-Labor Day Thursday, when the convention opens.

The web site has a full guest list and a featured list. The featured list is where the major authors  and actors appear. It is the only list I check because, unless you are self-published or have ten or fewer Twitter followers, that is the list you are usually on.

Except this year. This year, Wallace Shawn was too obscure to make the featured list, which is . . . wait for it . . . inconceivable. And Jerry Pournelle. Jerry wrote or edited 43 books. He won the Heinlein Society Award, the Prometheus Award, and the John W. Campbell Award. He was the president of SWFA and one of sci-fi’s leading lights. How was Jerry effing Pournelle left off the featured list?

(Don’t tell me they were added too late to make both lists. Arthur Darvill was on both despite being added the day before the con opened).

I had never met Jerry Pournelle at any convention, despite being a bibliophile and science fiction fan. Thus, there was a hole in my collection where his autograph belonged. Fortunately, I saw him on the web site before leaving home, so I grabbed my first edition of New Voices in Science Fiction: Stories by Campbell Award Nominees (1977). The book contains Jerry’s story “Silent Leges,” a masterpiece of military sci-fi. My copy was signed by George R.R. Martin. I wanted Jerry to sign it, too.

He was scheduled to be on a panel Friday afternoon. I got there early. Snagged a front row seat. The other panelists were milling, talking to fans, signing a book here or there. Then I heard someone say, “There’s Jerry.” Turning around, I expected to see the tuxedoed impresario on his Wikipedia page. Shuffling toward me instead was a gaunt man of many years being helped toward the stage. He used a walker. Settling into his chair, he sighed, the weight of a world (not this one, surely; one of his creation) on his shoulders.

I hate being the first to ask for an autograph, and as the panel was starting in ten minutes, I needed someone else to step up. And someone did. I was at the table next, passing Jerry my book and asking if I could have “a quick signature.” He turned the book in his hands like a rare gem.

“Am I in this?” he asked weakly.

“Yes sir,” I said, opening to the title page and handing him my pen.

“Am I a co-editor of this?” I was about to demur, but he answered himself: “No, that was George.” The pen I had given him was a felt tip Expresso, the only pen I can use without smearing the ink. He tried to sign his looping J and poked a hole in the page. I winced. He got it right the second time, though the signature was eroded-looking, like Sumerian clay tablets.

There. Target acquired. I needed to get my book back lest it suffer more damage, like a cracked spine. (Burt Ward did this at DragonCon 2012, opening my book so wide I heard the binding let go like a gunshot.) Inexplicably, I turned to the table of contents. “See? There’s your story,” I said. He smiled. “Oh yes,” he said. “That story.” Then he signed again, forgetting, I suppose, that he had already obliged me.

I don’t mean to ridicule. In fact, I admire Jerry for coming out to DragonCon. He was clearly unwell. Things got worse the following week, and he passed away on September 8. According to the New York Times, he “contracted a cold and flu on the trip.” I was getting over some sickness the day I met him. Did he contract my cold? Did I kill Jerry Pournelle?

I hope not. The memory of a once-vibrant writer hobbling down an aisle is haunting enough. It is hard seeing your heroes reduced by time. When I saw Adam West in 2013, he walked with a cane. William Shatner has put on a few cheb’a’. For some people, going to conventions is like going to a class reunion: they want to see who is still a geek or jock, who succeeded and who flopped, and who got old. I go to pay my respects. Knowing I was among the last people to see Jerry Pournelle alive is a sobering thought, one that has made me realize my responsibility as a fan: to treat celebrities with dignity. They show up for our entertainment; we show up for their actualization. Puts things in perspective, don’t you think?

Attendance at this year’s DragonCon was a record-setting 80,000-plus, which most people attributed to two factors: (1) Stan Lee, who had not been to DragonCon since 2012; and (2) a Doctor Who contingent of Billie Piper, Karen Gillan (who cancelled last year), Arthur Darvill, Alex Kingston–and Matt Smith. I heard that Matt was the first post-2005 Doctor to attend DragonCon, and he was terrific, humble and funny, though he wouldn’t shake my hand, offering the fist bump instead. Karen limited herself to the fist bump too. Alex and Billie shook hands and hugged people. Different strokes, I guess.

All the Brits were in one room, sitting at a row of tables. It would have made sense to have a single line, and if you had autograph tickets for, say, only two of the five, you would simply skip the ones you didn’t have tickets for. Instead, once you got, say, Matt’s autograph, you were directed into a separate line for someone else, and if you wanted a third autograph, you had to trudge to a third line, and so on. Bit of a nutter way to do things, if you ask me. Also daft was the fact that Billie Piper was there only one day, but when I bought autograph tickets on Friday, I was told she was there all weekend. I didn’t learn she was Sunday only until I showed up on Saturday. DragonCon is staffed by volunteers, and it is bedlam from start to finish, but I don’t think I’m out of bounds to ask the autograph ticket sellers to know when the autographers will be available.

Lines are a fact of convention life, and with more attendees than all but four NFL stadiums hold, I expected some lines to be interminable. What I didn’t expect, though maybe I should have, was a line to get into a building. Vendors and artists occupy three floors of Americas Mart 2, and last year, the fire marshall shut down the building one day because it was at capacity. To prevent that this year, DragonCon staffers were funneling people into a line outside, letting them in a few at a time. It was a workable but maddening solution. One vendor told me that, next year, the artists will be moved to the fourth floor of Americas Mart, which is an excellent idea. Spreading out attendees over more of the building should curb the overcrowding problem.

After being unable to interview guests last year, I was scheduled for two this year: Marina Sirtis and Jonathan Frakes. Remembering that only one of my two interviews in 2015 took place, I was cautiously optimistic. Turns out the caution was warranted, as was naked fury, because both Marina and Jonathan cancelled. Another reporter told me she had an interview with Gates McFadden, who simply didn’t show up.

To all DragonCon celebs: I know conventions aren’t your vacations. You are working while you’re there. I am working too, and I can’t do my work if you blow off a media session. Remember when you were young actors, struggling to make your way? People helped you, right? So pay that forward–help us. We’re not Nightline anchors. We need the exposure your interviews give us. I can’t speak for all reporters, but I make my interviews short and anodyne, possibly enjoyable. So if you agree to an interview, please keep it. That’s all we–I–ask.

This year was my seventh DragonCon, and despite my cavils, I love it. The show gets better every year. If you have the chance to attend, do it. Don’t say you’ll think about it. Don’t say you want to read more of my reviews first. Just go. But keep reading my reviews. And take a look at the pictures below. Talk to you soon.

Me with my colleague, Michaela McPherson. Check out her interview with Jai Nitz, creator of Suicide Squad’s El Diablo, on Convention Scene.

 

Cool board, bro.

 

Where’s Harley Quinn when you need her?

 

Never seen Marry Poppins and Bert cosplayers before. Excellent!

 

Excuse me, sir. Why is your suitcase wiggling?

 

Believe it or not, this is the first year I’ve seen a dragon at DragonCon.

 

When Michaela wanted to enter the armory, I told her she was axing for trouble.

 

When the rum is gone, you can buy more in the hotel bars . . . or from this guy.

 

Me Grimlock say, “Rawr.”

 

This guy is most definitely not a member of Hair Club for Men.

 

Before and after

 

DragonCon hoststhe Robert A. Heinlein “Pay It Forward” blood drive, which reached a milestone this year: 25,000 donors since 2002.

GA – The Cruel Prince Signing

Author Holly Black (Spiderwick Chronicles, Magisterium series) appears at the Georgia Center for the Book on Wednesday, January 3, 2018 at 7:00 PM to present and sign THE CRUEL PRINCE. Books for this event are sold by Little Shop of Stories.

By #1 New York Times bestselling author Holly Black, the first book in a stunning new series about a mortal girl who finds herself caught in a web of royal faerie intrigue.

Jude was seven years old when her parents were murdered and she and her two sisters were stolen away to live in the treacherous High Court of Faerie. Ten years later, Jude wants nothing more than to belong there, despite her mortality. But many of the fey despise humans. Especially Prince Cardan, the youngest and wickedest son of the High King.

To win a place at the Court, she must defy him—and face the consequences.

In doing so, she becomes embroiled in palace intrigues and deceptions, discovering her own capacity for bloodshed. But as civil war threatens to drown the Courts of Faerie in violence, Jude will need to risk her life in a dangerous alliance to save her sisters, and Faerie itself.

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Georgia Center for the Book at DCPL
215 Sycamore St, Decatur, GA 30030
(404) 370-3070

GA – Batman: Nightwalker Signing

Author Marie Lu appears at Little Shop of Stories on Thursday, January 18, 2018 at 7:00 PM to sign her new novel Batman: Nightwalker. You must purchase a copy of the book from the store in order to earn a place in the signing line.

Before he was Batman, he was Bruce Wayne. A reckless boy willing to break the rules for a girl who may be his worst enemy.

The Nightwalkers are terrorizing Gotham City, and Bruce Wayne is next on their list. The city’s elites are being taken out one by one as their mansions’ security systems turn against them, trapping them like prey. Meanwhile, Bruce is about to become eighteen and inherit his family’s fortune, not to mention the keys to Wayne Industries and all the tech gadgetry that he loves. But on the way home from his birthday party, he makes an impulsive choice and is sentenced to community service at Arkham Asylum, the infamous prison that holds the city’s most nefarious criminals.

Madeleine Wallace is a brilliant killer . . . and Bruce’s only hope. The most intriguing inmate in Arkham is Madeleine, a brilliant girl with ties to the Nightwalkers. A girl who will only speak to Bruce. She is the mystery he must unravel, but is he convincing her to divulge her secrets, or is he feeding her the information she needs to bring Gotham City to its knees?

In this second DC Icons book–following Leigh Bardugo’s Wonder Woman: Warbringer–Bruce Wayne is proof that you don’t need superpowers to be a superhero, but can he survive this game of tense intrigue, pulse-pounding action, and masterful deception?

Marie Lu is the author of the New York Times bestselling novels Legend, Prodigy, and Champion, as well as The Young Elites. She graduated from the University of Southern California and jumped into the video game industry, working for Disney Interactive Studios as a Flash artist. Now a full-time writer, she spends her spare time reading, drawing, playing Assassin’s Creed, and getting stuck in traffic. She lives in Los Angeles, California (see above: traffic), with one husband, one Chihuahua mix, and two Pembroke Welsh corgis.

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Little Shop of Stories
133A East Court Square, Decatur, GA 30030
(404) 373-6300

GA – Black Panther Premiere Event

Artists Brian Stelfreeze, Afua Richardson, and Lance Darden appear at Regal Cinemas Atlantic Station for a special Black Panther event on Thursday, February 15th at 5:30 PM.

Press Release:

Tuskegee Heirs presents, “An Exclusive Movie Premier Event with Black Panther!” Take Pictures with Black Panther (Cosplayer) via our Photo Booth, win raffle prizes, purchase posters, participate in our creator panel, and more!

We’re going to fill an entire theater room with Black Panther fans for the premier showing of the film, Thursday, February 15th at Atlantic Station (Atlanta, GA). The event will NOT be open to the public but never fear, you can lock in your tickets NOW to ensure your seat! Details at the link.

*COSPLAYERS*
Cosplaying/costumes are allowed during our event, however NO MASKS/HEADGEAR will be allowed into the theater. This includes Face paint, helmets, or any other items that obstruct a person’s face. We will hope to have a group photo after the movie, so feel free to join us.

Regal Cinemas Atlantic Station 18 IMAX & RPX
261 19th St NW #1250, Atlanta, GA 30363

MomoCon 2018 Welcomes FLCL Stars

MomoCon is happy to bring FLCL stars Kari Wahlgren, the original Haruko Haruhara, and Barbara Goodson, the voice of Naota, as special guests to the 2018 convention on May 24-27th!

From Animation to Anime to Video Games, Kari Wahlgren is one of the top voice actresses in Los Angeles. Her first role as Haruko in FLCL remains a fan favorite, and her voice can be heard in Emmy and Academy Award-winning animated films and TV shows. Major Animation Roles Include: Chloe Carmichael in The Fairly Oddparents, Tigress in Kung Fu Panda: Legends of Awesomeness, Jessica/Rick’s Spaceship in Rick and Morty, Shandra Jimenez in Gravity Falls, Starfire in Justice League VS. Teen Titans movie, Anka in Archer, Letta Turmond in Star Wars: The Clone Wars

Major Anime Roles Include: Haruko in FLCL, Fuu in Samurai Champloo Saber in Fate Zero and Fate Stay Night, Celty in Durarara, Kagami in Lucky Star, Tayuya in Naruto, Anemone in Eureka 7, Robin in Witch Hunter Robin Rip Van Winkle in Hellsing Major Video Game Roles Include: Jedi Female Knight in Star Wars: The Old Republic, Ashe in Final Fantasy XII, Tessa in Skylanders, Proctor Ingram in Fallout 4, Vex in Skyrim, Caithe in Guild Wars 2, Raine in Tales of Symphonia

Among the over 200 characters Barbara Goodson has voiced, she is most known for creating the voice of Empress Rita Repulsa on Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, Mother Talzin in Star Wars: The Clone Wars, Naota in FLCL, Red Fraggle in the animated Fraggle Rock, Granny Chiyo in Naruto, Lady Vashj in World of Warcraft, Sera and Marie Crystal in Robotech, Darling in Lady and the Tramp II, and Cruella DeVille and Cinderella’s Stepmother in Disney-On-Ice.

Other guests include Kimberly Brooks, Crispin Freeman, Kyle Hebert, Sean Schemmel, Tom Bancroft, Kate Leth, Sanford Greene, and many more!

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Have you registered for MomoCon 2018 yet?  Register as soon as possible to get the best rate on your 4-day membership for MomoCon 2018. Right now it is the early bird rate of $55, before the rate increase on January 1st. Be sure to register today and save!

About MomoCon   

Founded in 2004 by Jessica Merriman and Chris Stuckey, then students at Georgia Tech, MomoCon has grown from a 700 person on campus event to the largest event in the southeast United States for fans of video games, animation, cosplay, comics and tabletop games.

With 28,300 unique and over 71,000 turnstile attendance in 2016, MomoCon is one of the fastest growing all ages conventions in the country. Fans of Japanese Anime, American Animation, Comics, Video Games, and Tabletop Games come together to celebrate their passion by costuming / cosplay, browsing the huge exhibitors hall, meeting celebrity voice talent, designers, and writers behind their favorite shows, games, and comics and much much more over this 4 day event.

Atlanta Comic Convention (December 2017)

Atlanta

Convention Name
Atlanta Comic Convention
Convention Website Address
http://www.atlantacomicconvention.com
This convention will take place:
  • for one day only.
Date (Format mm/dd/yyyy)
12/17/2017
About This Convention
The NEXT Atlanta Comic Convention is DECEMBER 17th! This show features INSTANT CHRISTMAS!!!!! Everyone has the same problem during the Holidays…” I have 247 people to buy presents for, BUT I only have 5.00… Well are going to help one lucky Fan out….We are going to build a table with 5000.00 worth of merchandise including Comic Books ( Gold, Silver, Modern, Variants, Signed ,More) , Toys ( modern & vintage), Movie Posters, Signed Prints, Autographs , T-shirts, collectibles..MORE! .
With your paid admission of 5.00 , you will receive ONE Raffle ticket … If you come in costume , you will get TWO Raffle tickets,
If you wear an Atlanta Comic convention T-Shirt you get THREE tickets.
At 3pm , one of our Guests will draw a number from the Raffle box, and, if it matches YOUR number …INSTANT CHRISTMAS!!! You win EVERYTHING on the table. Bring a Truck!!! Here are pictures of some of theBooths we have given away at our past shows!
GUEST FOR THE SHOW
BO HAMPTON Artist of Batman, Moon knight , Hellraiser, Alien Worlds, More!
The show is 11am to 5 pm , Marriott Hotel – Century Center, 2000 Century Blvd , Atlanta Ga 30345. The BEST One Day Show in the South! 4 times a year for 23 years! Over ONE MILLION Comic Books ( Gold, Silver, Variants, CGC, Hottest Titles from 1.00 to 10,000) Toys ( Vintage and New, Marvel Legends, DC Direct, Pops, Star Wars) , Dr. Who, Posters , X-Files, Star Trek, Pokémon, Yu Gi Oh, Bladed Weapons ( knives and swords) , Tradepaperbacks … More! www.atlantacomicconvention.com for full details.
Venue Name and Address
Marriott Hotel-Century Center
2000 Century Blvd
Atlanta, Ga 30345
United States
Map It
Number of Dealer/Exhibitor Tables
60
Please select the Category that best describes the convention
Comic Books
Additional Categories
  • Horror
  • Science Fiction and Fantasy
  • Collectibles
Guests
Bo Hampton

GA – Kate Hudson Signing

Actress Kate Hudson in conversation with Emily Giffin at the Georgia Center for the Book on Monday, November 6th at 6:00 PM to present her new book PRETTY FUN! Tickets available at the link…

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Georgia Center for the Book at DCPL
215 Sycamore St, Decatur, GA 30030
(404) 370-3070

GA – Spinning Signing

Cartoonist Tillie Walden appears at Little Shop of Stories on Friday, September 22nd at 7:00 PM to sign her graphic novel Spinning from First Second Books.

About Spinning:
Figure skating was Tillie Walden’s life. She woke before dawn for morning lessons, went straight to group practice after school, and spent weekends competing in glitter and tights. It was a central piece of her identity, her safe haven from the stress of school, bullies, and family. But as Tillie’s interests evolve, from her growing passion for art to a first love realized with a new girlfriend, she begins to question how the close-minded world of figure skating fits in. Poignant and captivating, this powerful graphic memoir captures what it’s like to come of age, come out, and come to terms with leaving behind everything you used to know.

This event is free and open to the public! Attendees must purchase a copy of the book from us to earn a place in the signing line.

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Little Shop of Stories
133A East Court Square, Decatur, GA 30030
(404) 373-6300

GA – An Evening with Wallace Shawn

Wallace Shawn (The Princess Bride, My Dinner with Andre, Toy Story) appears in conversation with local playwright and professor Margaret Baldwin at Horizon Theatre on Thursday, August 31st at 7:00 PM to read and discuss Night Thoughts. This is a ticketed event. Tickets include a signed copy of the book from A Cappella Books.

Although he is guided and inspired by the people he respects, and despite the insufficiency of his knowledge and experience—an insufficiency shared by most (or all) other humans, Wallace Shawn can’t see any real alternative to trying to figure out his own answers to the most essential questions about the world he lives in.

Having recently passed the age of seventy, before which he found it difficult to piece together more than a few fragments of understanding, Shawn would like to pass on anything he’s learned before death or dementia close down the brief window available to him, but he may not be ready yet.

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Horizon Theatre
1083 Austin Avenue NW, Atlanta, GA 30307

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