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  • NYC – Troma Signing

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    Press Release:

    Forbidden Planet is stoked to announce a Troma signing on Thursday April 30th at 7:00 PM! Meet Lloyd Kaufman (Troma President and creator of The Toxic Avenger), Ethan Hurt (Composer of the Class of Nuke ‘Em High Theme), and Lisa Gaye (star of Class of Nuke ‘ Em High 2 & 3, Toxic Avenger 2-4, and many more Troma classiscs!

    Forbidden Planet
    832 Broadway, New York, NY 10003
    212-473-1576

    WA – Free Comic Book Day 2015

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    Steve Lieber, Jonathan Case, Dan Schkade, Jeremy Colwell, Anina Bennett, and Paul Guinan appear at I Like Comics on Saturday May 2nd for Free Comic Book Day!

    10am – 12pm: Jonathan Case (Batman ’66) & Steve Lieber (Superior Foes of Spider-Man)
    12pm – 2pm: Dan Schkade (San Hannibal) & Jeremy Colwell (IDW, Dark Horse)
    2pm – 4pm: Anina Bennett & Paul Guinan (Boilerplate, Heartbreakers)

    Artists will be bringing prints, sketchbooks and original art. Sketch availability and prices will vary from artist. Plus there will be Huge Sales, a Costume Contest, and a selection of Free Comics!

    RSVP on Facebook!

    I Like Comics
    1715 Broadway Street, Vancouver, Washington 98663
    (360) 852-8890

    Wizard World Comic Con Raleigh 2015 Report! (Including an Interview with Kevin Sorbo)

    Back in the fall of 2014, when I saw that Wizard World, that latter-day arbiter of pop culture sensibilities, was having its first-ever convention in Raleigh, North Carolina on March 13-15, I thought, Cool. I had been to the Minneapolis and Chicago shows, traveling hundreds of miles to write about each (see here and here, respectively). Raleigh is only 45 minutes from my house.

    When I later saw that William Shatner would be at Raleigh Wizard World, I thought, Sweet. Who better than the Captain to explore this strange, new world? I watched as more excellent guests were announced—Sean Astin, John Schneider, Kevin Sorbo. And when I saw Rob Liefeld, the creator of Deadpool, added to the list, I thought, Awesome! Liefeld is one of the hottest comic artists of the last twenty years. I need some more stuff signed by him.

    And when I received an email on February 24 from Wizard World’s PR person telling me that Doctor Who’s David Tennant would be in Raleigh, I thought, Oh. My. God.

    David Tennant! No offense to other guests, but this was huge. Poll after poll shows him as the most popular Doctor among Whovians (see here, here, and here). Tennant’s Doctor is charming, funny, and passionate. Christopher Eccleston, the Ninth Doctor, did the hard work of rebooting the twenty-year-dead series in 2005; Tennant presided over its expansion both in the UK and across the pond. Plus he is a rarity on the convention circuit. Raleigh would be, in fact, his Wizard World debut (his second appearance will be in Philadelphia this May).

    I am a middling Doctor Who fan. My wife and daughter? Rabid. And their favorite, of course, is David Tennant. My wife makes and sells fandom-related jewelry, and she had another convention that weekend in Winston-Salem, about two hours away. Urban Dictionary defines fandom as “a cult that will destroy your life”; I prefer to think of it as the impetus for restructuring your life on the fly. Thus, after much wrangling and a pair of David Tennant VIP tickets ($399 each!), we settled on the following schedule:

    Friday: My wife and me at Wizard World, our daughter at the Winston-Salem convention

    Saturday: All of us at the Winston convention

    Sunday: My wife and my daughter at Wizard World to see David Tennant, me at the Winston convention

    Actually, my weekend started on Thursday, at the Wizard World launch party. It was held at the Marbles Kids Museum in downtown Raleigh.

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    Advertisements for the party indicated that celebrities (plural) would be in attendance, though the only one I saw was Kevin Sorbo, star of the 90s hit series Hercules. Still, we had a nice chat:

    Me: You have been in several faith-based movies [What If . . . and God’s Not Dead]. What is it about these movies that speaks to people?

    Kevin: There are a lot of people who have faith. All the polls show like 80% of people believe in God. We tend to skim over that, and Hollywood doesn’t put out movies that deal with that. And when they do, they sort of bastardize it. Look what they did with Exodus. Look what they did with Noah, for crying out loud. Why would you hire atheist directors to do something out of the Old Testament? It’s weird to me.

    Me: The emphasis there seems to be more on special effects.

    Kevin: Yeah. We went to a private screening of Noah, and my wife said, “This is like Transformers meets Water World.” Visually, it’s beautiful, but you’re like, does the Bible talk about Noah being schizophrenic, alcoholic, and hell-bent on killing his own family at the end?

    Me: You’ve had a varied career, but of course you’re most known for Hercules . . .

    Kevin: Yeah, that and Andromeda.

    Me: Right. How did your role in Hercules come about?

    Kevin: It was a typical audition through Hollywood. My agent called me up and said, “They’re casting five Hercules movies, and they want to see you.” I said, “I’m a big guy, but don’t they want some steroid dude with no neck or some bodybuilder who weighs 280 pounds?” He said, “No, they’re looking for an athletic-looking, sort-of decathlon, Joe Namath-type quarterback.” So I went and read. They called me back and called me back. Seven times they called me back. I was up in Vancouver, Canada filming an episode of The Commish, and they called me and said, “You’re Hercules.” I thought it was going to be five two-hour movies. Then, boom! It became a series, and it passed Baywatch to become the most-watched show in the world.

    Me: Before filming, how did you get into the role? How did you prepare yourself to play a mythical hero?

    Kevin: It was all in the writing. They made the character very 90s. It was a very Malibu sort of Hercules. He was very hip and accessible and approachable, very self-effacing. There was a lot of humor. The fight scenes were never very violent. Our spin-off show, Xena, was a much more violent show, killing guys. We never killed a guy.

    Me: Speaking of writing, you did a book a couple of years ago. What was that like?

    Kevin: It’s been great because of the number of speaking appearances I get. I did a dozen last year, and I’ve already got about eleven more lined up this year. It’s been amazing to get out there and do all the talking I’ve been doing about the book, which is about a health scare I suffered. I was the healthiest-looking guy in the world in the 90s, and I had three strokes and almost died. It took me out of the show [Hercules] for four months. We had to re-write everything.

    Me: Which is harder, writing or acting?

    Kevin [laughs]: I think writing is much harder. Writers take much of the blame for everything in Hollywood, so God bless them. It’s the toughest job around.

    Me: How did you get started doing conventions?

    Kevin: You know, conventions really didn’t kick off until about fifteen years ago. The growth has been astronomical. In the 90s, comic cons weren’t that big. They were around, but there wasn’t the publicity and the push and the hype. I got invited during the 90s, but I could do only one or two a year because I was in New Zealand ten months out of the year [filming Hercules]. Now, I go to a lot around the world. I’m doing two in April in Australia. I have one coming up in Belgium. I get invited to about five a month, and I go to six or seven a year.

    Me: Are there things you won’t do for fans? Are there lines fans try to get you to cross that you push back against?

    Kevin: Not really. Women have not exposed their breasts to me, but they have wanted me to sign the top of their chests. Some people get very nervous because they know you from TV, and now they’re seeing you in the flesh. It’s a surreal moment for them, and I get that because when I first moved to L.A., I started meeting some of the celebrities I used to watch on TV, and I was like, “Wow. That’s really him standing there.” For me, it was Anthony Quinn [who played Zeus in Hercules]. Meeting him blew me away.

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    The next night, Friday, was my night at Wizard World. It is often said that Wizard World, with its deep pockets and runaway costs, delights in squeezing out local conventions. See, for example, this article decrying “William Shatner at $199 an autograph,” which is ludicrously inflated. Shatner charges less than half that amount, and he has charged it for years.

    What has changed, and not for the better, is the number of comic book artists who now charge for an autograph. Michael Golden charged $10. Dean Haspiel (who?) charged $10. Tom DeFalco gave one or two free signatures, but he charged after that due to, as the sign on his table exhorted, the miserable capitalists who sell his stuff on eBay.

    And Rob Liefeld. When I saw him in 2012, he charged $20 to sign copies of New Mutants #87 (first appearance of Cable) or #98 (first appearance of Deadpool). Everything else was free. Now he charges $30 for any Deadpool item, $20 for any New Mutants or X-Force issue, and $20 for any book being witnessed by CGC. He’s still a cool guy, though, and he did not charge me for this picture.

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    I get that writers and artists are trying to make a living. A market exists for their autographs that they did not create and are merely tapping into. But their judgment—or is jealousy?—of collectors feels wrong-headed. eBay does not lower payments to creators (a buyer’s market does that) nor deprive them of ownership of their work (publishers retain this). Besides, CGC’s fees are rich enough. To pay an extra $20 for the signature hurts.

    Perhaps it was this increase in signing fees that was responsible for the small crowd.

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    Or the fact that few celebrities showed up for opening night (aside from Tony Stark).

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    The dealer’s room was livelier, but what struck me most there was the dearth of comic book dealers. I counted two. The rest had toys, decals, T-shirts, etc. Curiously, there were also the Lasik Vision Institute and the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, giving the dealer’s room a festival-in-the-park feel. I left without buying anything (or scheduling eye surgery).

    I tried to buy a third David Tennant autograph ticket for Sunday, the day my wife and daughter would be there, for my daughter’s friend. But they were not selling any more tickets until Sunday morning—possibly (as it turned out, they didn’t have more then, either). “It’s the first time we’ve worked with him,” said the apologetic young woman, “and we’re not sure what to expect.” Translation: they had under-prepared. Wizard World has remedied this (sort of) for Philadelphia, making David Tennant photos and autographs available only to VIP ticket buyers. It’s an imperfect solution: a limited quantity of tickets at a cost that prices a lot of people out of contention. But at least they won’t run out by the first day of the con.

    So my daughter’s friend lost out. My wife and daughter, however, racked up, each of them receiving (1) any item autographed, (2) a professional photo-op, (3) a David Tennant collector’s card, (4) other Doctor Who stuff, and (5) a limited edition Walking Dead comic book with a black-and-white sketch cover by Dean Haspiel (so that’s who he is!). And they got into the Tennant Q&A, which, we found out, was open only to VIPs because the room was so small. (My question: why didn’t they rearrange the rooms? It’s David Tennant. You can bump the Harry Potter fan fiction panel to a snack bar table.)

    If the crowd was meager on Friday, it had Hulked up by Sunday. There were 500 VIP ticket holders that day (600 on Saturday), plus who knows how many who managed to get a one-day autograph or photo ticket before they were sold out. My wife took over 100 pictures during the Q&A, enough to allow us to play a game called The Many Faces of David Tennant.

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    David ponders why the TARDIS isn’t cleaner on the inside.

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    David does his Gilbert Gottfried impression.

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    David whistles “Dixie,” because he’s in the South.

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    David tries to hypnotize the crowd but puts himself to sleep.

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    This is David Tennant, not David Bowie.

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    “Blimey, Rose! I told you to close the TARDIS door before take-off!”

    Tennant is surprised at how popular Doctor Who has become in the United States—surprised but pleased. Asked about his acting career, he said he likes the variety of roles (in his new drama, Broadchurch, he plays a character as far from the Doctor as you can imagine). Whom would he cosplay as at a convention? “Someone with a mask, so I could enjoy the convention.” One questioner recommended that he try the barbecue before leaving North Carolina. This apparently led to a discussion of food in which he dissed American bacon (too dry and crunchy).  Another asked him who he fanboys over. Answer: Marvel Comics, which he had recently toured.

    After the Q&A came photos, and about an hour after that, the signing line started. When my daughter reached the table, she asked Tennant if she could record him saying hello to her friend (the one who got gypped on the autograph). Most celebs won’t do this, but in the absence of an advertised prohibition, it doesn’t hurt to ask. Astonishingly, he agreed! Then a Wizard World staffer stepped in and put a stop to it. Normally, I would rail against this, but the staffer had a point. If Tennant did that for my daughter, he would have to do it for everyone, which would slow the line to a crawl. The lesson for convention goers is this: guests aren’t being rude or aloof when they refuse some of your requests. The refusal may simply be a matter of convention policy.

    So the inaugural Wizard World Raleigh was a success. Great city, great guests, friendly service—and the Doctor. One woman my wife talked to had driven eight hours from Alabama with her two kids to see him. On top of the arm-and-leg-ness of VIP tickets, this struck me as insanely devoted. “Would you do that?” I asked my wife on Monday as she stared out the kitchen window, a melancholy smile on her face. “Yes,” she said without hesitation. “Yes I would.”

    Well-played, Wizard World. Well-played.

     

    New Star Wars Trailer is Here!

     

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    Capital City Comic Con Debuts on May 2nd-3rd 2015

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    Press Release:

    The Capital City Comic Con, greater Lansing’s first comic convention, will be held on May 2nd and 3rd, 2015 at Haslett High School! Guests include: Adam Talley, Matt Feazell, Rick Chambers, Daniel J. Hogan, Randall W. Scott, the 501st Legion, and the Lansing Derby Vixens!

    Located in the heart of Michigan, Capital City Comic Con is conveniently located within an hour and half of some of Michigan’s largest cities, including metro-Detroit, Flint, Grand Rapids and Jackson.

    Check out www.capcitycomiccon.com for the latest news, purchase tickets, check out our gaming and cosplay, register for a booth, and more!

    We welcome a variety of vendors, exhibitors and attendees, including comics, cards, games, action figures, memorabilia, books, movies, apparel, cosplayers and more!

    Capital City Comic Con is committed to bringing an amazing, fun-filled weekend to the greater Lansing community.

    To buy tickets, click the link, or download the EventBrite app to your mobile device. Save money on presale tickets and two-day passes!

    RSVP on Facebook!

    CA – Once Upon A Cloud Signing

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    Join Claire Keane (Frozen, Tangled) for a Mother’s day event in Venice Saturday, May 9th at 4:00 PM where she will be drawing, reading and signing Once Upon A Cloud at Ecole Claire Fontaine. There will be activities for the whole family and gifts to make for the moms in your life.

    RSVP on Facebook!

    Ecole Claire Fontaine
    1047 Abbot Kinney, Venice, CA 90291

    FL – Free Comic Book Day 2015

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    Mike Perkins, Paul Pelletier, Dawn McTeigue, Mike Maihack, Scott Blair, Sajad Shah, Tony Kordos, Jamie Jones, Ozzy Fernandez, Chip Skelton, Martin Dunn, John Rivett, Steven Wittmaack, and Jen Mercer appear at Heroes Haven on Saturday May 2nd to celebrate Free Comic Book Day!

    RSVP on Facebook!

    Heroes Haven
    4339 Gunn Hwy, Tampa, FL 33618
    813-269-8859

    MA – Adult Beginners Screening

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    Comedian Nick Kroll appears in person to speak about the film following this screening on Wednesday, April 22 at 7:00 pm.

    Get tickets at the link…

    About the movie:

    A young, hipster entrepreneur (Nick Kroll) crashes and burns on the eve of his company’s big launch.

    With his entire life in disarray, he leaves Manhattan to move in with his estranged pregnant sister (Rose Byrne), brother-in-law (Bobby Cannavale) and three year-old nephew in the suburbs, only to become their manny. Faced with real responsibility, he may finally have to grow up, but not without some bad behavior first.

    Coolidge Corner Theatre 
    290 Harvard Street, Brookline, MA 02446-2908
    617-566-6660

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    CA – Goners Signing

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    Jacob Semahn appears at Phat Collectibles on Saturday, May 9th at 2:00 pm to sign Goners!

    RSVP on Facebook!

    Phat Collectibles
    1201 S. Euclid Street, Anaheim, CA 92804
    (714) 808-9355

    MD – Roche Limit: Clandestiny #1 Signing

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    Writer Michael Moreci (Hoax Hunters, Burning Fields) appears at Third Eye Comics on Saturday, May 9th from 11:00 am – 8:00 pm to celebrate the launch of Roche Limit: Clandestiny #1!

    RSVP on Facebook!

    Third Eye Comics
    2027-A West Street, Annapolis, MD 21401
    (410) 897-0322

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