Scene and Reviewed: The Witch

June 27, 2016 by  
Filed under Everything Else, Horror, Movies

The Witch

Remember high school, when we had to read several “classics” of literature? The Scarlet Letter, Moby-Dick, A Tale of Two Cities—you know the ones. These books were classics because they broke new ground, doing things that had not been done before.

God, were they boring! They were books only a professor could love. I was reminded of such books when I watched The Witch, Robert Eggers’s tale of an unlucky girl suspected of witchcraft. Critics have loved the film, giving it 91%, 83 out of 100, 3½ stars, etc. Stephen King tweeted the movie “scared the hell out of” him. It did well at the box office, grossing nearly $40 million on a $1 million budget, but that may be because audiences were expecting The Blair Witch Project redux. I suspect that DVD and Blu-ray sales will be more modest. Film students may study this movie for years to come—it is visually gorgeous and technically advanced—but I doubt it will maintain a larger following.

The movie starts promisingly. Set in New England in 1630, it is the story of a farming family, William and Katherine and their five children. (Other reviews of The Witch call them Puritans, an assumption that may not be true. They are clearly pious, but piety was not limited to any one religious group. Besides, the Great Migration, as it is called, of Puritans to New England began in earnest in 1630, the year this movie was set.) After a tiff with other settlers, William moves his family to the edge of forbidding-looking woods. Immediately, the youngest child, an infant, disappears. The family’s search for the missing boy, and its descent into anger, finger-pointing, and suspicion of demonic involvement, forms the plot for the rest of the film.

So who is the witch of the movie’s title? That would be the oldest daughter, Thomasin. We are never told her age, though she is clearly a teenager. The family first thinks a wolf took the child, but as tensions mount, this becomes a polite fiction. Thomasin was looking after her brother when he vanished, so naturally, she is doing the work of the devil. It isn’t clear what prompted the family to think Thomasin a witch, or why. We tend to imagine people of this era attributing every odd occurrence to dark magic, but surely they had a deeper cosmology than that. Not once does anyone lash out at God for allowing such tragedy, a reaction that seems at least as normal as “because witches.”

Robert Eggers, a former production and costume designer who somehow leapfrogged all other roles to direct The Witch, has been praised for the historical accuracy of the film. A note at the end states that many of the details, including dialogue, come “directly from period journals, diaries, and court records.” No doubt the scenes and wardrobes are spot-on. I wonder also whether Eggers consulted a little book called The New England Primer. Published in 1727, but no doubt circulating in oral form long before, it includes a section called “A Dialogue between Christ, a Youth, and the Devil” whose lines are similar to a prayer uttered several times in the movie: “Oh God my Lord I now begin. Oh help me and I’ll leave my sin,” etc. Whether inspired or made up, it is an excellent detail (you can hear Thomasin reciting it around the 1:55 mark of this trailer).

One thing I could have done without is the decision to have the actors speak in the archaic tongue of the early 1600s. The film is full of “thee” and “thou,” with the occasional “prithee.” One character says, “Speak, if this be pretense,” and other announces, “I’ll to the wood.” Early Modern English, which is what linguists call this time period, can feel like a different language. I had to turn on subtitles to make sure I didn’t miss stuff, a practice I hate. (Diction wasn’t the only reason. Despite setting the volume on my TV at 50, I strained to hear anything softer than a shout.) Many period pieces have not suffered from contemporary speech—Shakespeare in Love won seven Oscars without a single “thou”—so I don’t understand Eggers’s compulsion here.

Another thing I struggled to grasp was what constitutes a “witch” in Eggers’s world. Toward the end of the film, Thomasin talks to Black Phillip, the family goat. Goats have long been associated with Satan, so does that mean a witch is someone who can talk to possessed animals? No, because two of the other children claim they’ve heard the goat talk. Thomasin kills her mother, so does that mean a witch is someone who commits murder? No, it was self-defense: her mother attacked her. Thomasin seems uninterested in magic and incurious about dark forces, so it must be that she is a witch because weird things are happening. There is that limited cosmology again. Black Phillip asks Thomasin if she wants to live “deliciously,” and as far as I can tell, this vague invocation is the crux of Eggers’s witchery. What does it mean to live deliciously? Kidnap babies, I guess.

The best horror films rely on suspense, not gore, and in that way, The Witch scores big. As I watched Katherine go insane with grief, Thomasin struggle with guilt, and William become Job-like (in addition to the baby, his crops died, his wife didn’t trust him, and he watched another son die), I thought, all this plus witchcraft? But for a horror story, the evil force needs more definition. Michael Myers, Jason Voorhees, Fred Krueger—these are great horror villains because we can see them, and we know what they’re about. The Blair Witch never appears in person, but we see her stalking the three filmmakers. We hear locals talk about kids being abducted and killed. Then Josh disappears. Problems are clearly supernatural in origin. In The Witch, I never felt that William’s struggles couldn’t be explained by his living arrangements: the American wilderness in the 17th century.

In terms of extras, this Blu-ray is not packed, but it does have a few nice elements. The audio commentary features Eggers alone. I am used to commentaries featuring several cast members in an improvised dialogue, but these quickly wear thin. A director-only commentary can be more focused and insightful, which this one certainly is. There is a short (eight minutes) making-of featurette, The Witch: A Primal Folklore, that should be a bit more in-depth. Much better is the Q&A mixing cast members with a pair of experts, novelist Brunonia Barry (The Lace Reader, The Map of True Places) and historian Richard Trask. The group discusses witchcraft in American history, especially the Salem witch trials, on which Trask has a unique perspective: two of his ancestors were hanged as witches.

Interesting as these features are, I will suggest one that should have been added: digital images of the “period journals, diaries, and court records” that Eggers drew on to make the film. I would have enjoyed seeing how those print sources were transformed into a cinematic narrative.

The Witch is an entertaining and though-provoking film. It works as a historical drama as well as a thriller. I wouldn’t call it scary, and the filmmakers outsmarted themselves in a few places, making an intellectual choice when something simpler would have worked better. Still, it is an important film, one that makes an original and significant contribution to the horror genre.

PROGRAM INFORMATION

Year of Production: 2015

Type: Theatrical Release

Rating: R for Disturbing Violent Content and Graphic Nudity

Genre: Horror, Suspense

Closed Captioned: N/A

Subtitles: Spanish, English SDH

Feature Run Time: 92 minutes

BD Format: 1080p High Definition 16×9 Widescreen (1.66:1)

DVD Format: 16×9 Widescreen (1:66:1)

BD Audio: English 5.1 DTS HD-MA

DVD Audio: English 5.1 Dolby Digital Audio

ABOUT LIONSGATE

Lionsgate is a premier next generation global content leader with a strong and diversified presence in motion picture production and distribution, television programming and syndication, home entertainment, digital distribution, new channel platforms, video game sand international distribution and sales. The company has nearly 80 television shows on 40 different networks spanning its primetime production, distribution and syndication businesses. These include the critically-acclaimed hit series Orange in the New Black, the multiple Emmy Award-winning drama Mad Men, the hit broadcast network series Nashville, the syndication successes The Wendy Williams Show and Celebrity Name Game (with FremantleMedia), the breakout series The Royals and the Golden Globe-nominated dramedy Casual.

Its feature film business has been fueled by such successes as the blockbuster Hunger Games franchise, the first two installments of the Divergent franchise, Sicario, The Age of Adaline, CBS/Lionsgate’s The DUFF, John Wick, Now You See Me, Roadside Attractions’ Love & Mercy and Mr. Holmes, Lionsgate/Codeblack Films’ Addicted and Pantelion Films’ Instructions Not Included, the highest-grossing Spanish-language film ever released in the U.S.

Lionsgate’s home entertainment business is an industry leader in box office-to-DVD and box office-to-VOD revenue conversion rates. Lionsgate handles a prestigious and prolific library of approximately 16,000 motion picture and television titles that is an important source of recurring revenue and serves as the foundation for the growth of the company’s core businesses. The Lionsgate and Summit brands remain synonymous with original, daring, quality entertainment in markets around the world. See www.lionsgate.com.

Rhode Island Comic-Con 2015 Report (with an interview with Chris Claremont)!

logo

I went to Rhode Island to see John and Chris. John is my best friend of 25 years. We have been through it all: four divorces (two each), five marriages (he can make it six), new careers, new houses, and the almost-death of his first son, Jonathan, back in 2000. John and I have been to a number of conventions together (see here, for example), and it was time to add the Rhode Island Comic-Con to our roll.

Chris is Chris Claremont. I love John like a brother, but let’s be clear: Chris is what drew me, a lifelong Southerner, to New England on the cusp of winter (November 5-8). I have been a fan of Chris since high school, when my friend Margot introduced me to a pretty cool comic called The Uncanny X-Men. The first issue I bought was #216. I read it, was hooked, and started buying it each month. My father noticed my zeal, and realizing he could teach investment skills while doing something fun with his soon-to-be-too-old-for-him son, he started advancing me allowances to buy back issues. I learned to grade comics and spot value, and within a year, I owned issues as far back as #12, the first appearance of Juggernaut.

I just realized: that was when Stan Lee was still writing the series.

Eventually, I let my collection stagnate, and then I sold it in 1999 for a couple thousand bucks so I could marry wife #2. (Now I don’t have her or the comics, and guess which I miss more?) But I never forgot my adoration of Chris Claremont. Then I saw he would be in Rhode Island, and I called John, with whom I hadn’t planned a trip all year. John said, “I’m in,” and I thought, You better be.

Rhode Island Comic-Con isn’t as large as San Diego or C2E2, and it isn’t as venerable as, say, DragonCon. But it is on the rise. I had this brought home to me when I talked to Susan Soares, the director of media. She told me she was expecting 60,000 attendees. In 2012, there were 16,000. This is an increase of 275%—in only three years! It is the “largest and most income-generating event in the state,” according to Susan, who expects the convention to keep growing because (1) Rhode Island is not a saturated market, (2) the staff is professional and easy-going, and (3) they advertise the heck out of it.

The growth hasn’t been easy to manage, however. In 2014, the convention made headlines for the wrong reasons, overselling and getting shut down for half a day by the Providence fire marshal (see this link for the full story). I asked Susan how that contretemps would be avoided this year, and she outlined a three-part strategy:

Expansion. Last year’s event was confined to the convention center in downtown Providence. This year, they planned to situate some elements (like the dealer room) in the adjacent Dunkin Donuts Center.

Day 3. Instead of being Saturday and Sunday only, this year’s convention would start on Friday.

Scanned badges. Using the New York Comic-Con model, convention employees would scan badges as people enter and exit. This would allow them to track how many people are in the convention center at any time, thereby not exceeding capacity and getting shut down.

Overall, the strategy was a success. They had sold out of Saturday one-day tickets by 11:00am on Saturday, but I heard no other accounts of people being turned away. There were, however, navigation problems. In a convention spread across two buildings, I was surprised by the dearth of directional signs. Plus there were no printed maps—the only map was on the mobile app—so all weekend, I heard people murmuring “Where is the dealer room?” or “I can’t find Vic Mignogna’s table!”

After two circumnavigations of artist alley, I found Chris Claremont, who had been gracious enough to agree to an interview.

Me: Chris, I want you to know: you are the reason I am at this convention. I wanted to see you. Princess Leia? Pssssh. Besides, she cancelled.

Chris: Oh, really? She cancelled?

Me: Yeah. [And she wasn’t the only one. Nearly a dozen celebrities were quietly flensed from the web site as of Friday morning. I’m used to one or two no-shows, but double digits?]

Chris: The funniest thing I’ve heard is the projected opening weekend gross for that film global is one billion. I saw the very first show of Star Wars at the Astor Plaza in New York, and it was empty. It gradually filled up, but there were empty seats, and we figured, nice movie when it started, but when it finished, it was like, holy shit. We walked out the door, and the line was four-deep around the block, and it didn’t go away for about three months.

Me: Speaking of movies, what do you think about Marvel’s movies, especially X-Men?

Chris: So far, Marvel has done very, very well. Kevin Feige is a brilliant film exec. Lauren Shuler-Donner is a brilliant film exec. Between the two of them, they have nailed the Marvel pantheon. The X-Men movies maybe aren’t as financially lucrative as The Avengers. On the other hand, the casting of them is breathtaking, from the first X-Men to Days of Future Past—and, from all accounts, Apocalypse. Kevin, by the same token, starting with Iron Man, it’s been an incredible ride. I mean, Ant-Man? Who would have thought Ant-Man?

Me: Ant-Man was good.

Chris: That’s the point. It was good. And, more importantly, the actors playing the roles seem to enjoy the experience. They want to come back for more.

Me: Did you have any involvement in the X-Men movies?

Chris: Well, I helped crystallize the deal that got it all started back in the beginning, when I was briefly an executive at Marvel. I provided north of 80 percent of the source material for the characters. I mean, they’re all my guys and gals. And two-thirds of them are pretty much straight adaptations of my work. I suppose you could honestly say it was all my fault.

Me: And we’re very grateful.

Chris: Actually, the funny part is, every so often I sneak into the Marvel movies. Scarlett Johannson’s secret identity in Iron Man 2, when she walks into Tony’s house and is introduced as Natalie Rushman . . . well, Natalie Rushman is a secret identity that I invented for the Black Widow when she did a four-part team-up where she had lost her memory as the Black Widow and thought she was a schoolteacher from Boston named Natalie Rushman [this takes place in Marvel Team-Up #82-85, and the alias is actually Nancy Rushman].

Me: Cool. Switching gears a little, you’ve written comic books, and you’ve written prose novels. What’s the difference in writing the two?

Chris: When you’re writing comics, the writer’s job is to tell the story to the visual artist. All the work that goes into writing a novel goes into describing the scene. [He opens a copy of Marada the She-Wolf. A Red Sonja-like character, Marada was created by Chris and the English artist John Bolton.] So it’s describing this scene so that John Bolton could bring it to life brilliantly. Which he does. It’s giving him the sequence of events and allowing him to do what he does best, which is draw a picture that makes you go, wow! When I first drafted this scene, there was going to be lots of dialogue about how she lost her father, lost her mother, yadda yadda yadda, blah blah blah. But when I got to the scene, when you see the images, when you get to this image, you don’t need any words. I mean, if you can’t figure out what’s going on, if you can’t figure out the emotional relationships just from looking at it, then neither of us is doing our job. John did his job brilliantly, unlike me talking now. The key to being a writer in comics is to know when to shut the hell up and let the artist do the work.

Me: So would your instructions for that panel be “Have someone lying on the bed,” or would you describe exactly how it should look?

Chris: Well, depends on the scene. Marvel did a 9/11 remembrance book [Heroes, released December 2001] where a writer and an artist would team up to do a poster commemorating what happened and how they felt about it, and when my page came around, I spent about 2,000 words describing the scene, and Salvador [Larocca] just drew this brilliant, brilliant picture, and as far as I was concerned, it didn’t need anything more from me. I had done my work, he had done his work, and the end result was brilliant.

Me: Very good. So you were inducted into the Comic Book Hall of Fame earlier this year. What was that like?

Chris: A lot of fun. One of the more unexpected things in my life. It’s way too cool for the likes of me.

Me: It doesn’t surprise me at all.

Chris: Well, you can think that. I’m not supposed to because I’m supposed to be shy and modest. But it’s way cool.

Me: When did you start doing conventions?

Chris: When they started asking me. How else can you meet the fans? In the old days, it was more fun because people would write letters, and the nice thing about them is it tells you what they were thinking of and how they were reacting to specific issues. Now it’s all posted online, and you seriously have to go looking for it. There aren’t that many hours in a day. But conventions are a really nice way of putting a face on the readership.

Me: What are a couple of your more memorable convention experiences?

Chris: Just meeting people. It’s a weird sensation when you run into creators, actors, people you’ve respected, and they tell you how cool you are, and you go, “No no no, that’s my line.”

Me: Do fans ever just go to pieces meeting you? Do they cry? Hyperventilate?

Chris: Oh yeah. But the cool thing is that now I’m starting to see a lot more young kids coming, which leads one to believe there’s hope.

Me: What advice would you give to aspiring writers?

Chris: Get a day job [laughs]. Being a writer is like being an artist: if you’ve got the bug, you do it. You don’t argue. You can’t argue. Then it’s just a matter of kicking at the wall until something sells. And then, once you make the first sell, you go for the second, then the third, then the fourth, and so on. There’s no real secret to being a writer. There’s just having an idea and then having the madcap determination to see it through to fruition.

You might assume this is an excerpt from the interview. It is not. This short conversation lasted over 20 minutes because we were sitting at Chris’s table in artist alley, and he was signing books all the while. My recording of the interview is peppered with crowd noise, his sidebars with other fans, and announcements blasted over the PA system. Chris had trouble getting into the convention—apparently, his vendor badge could not be located—and the interview started late, when he already had more people waiting for him than a Soviet bread line. Yet it was one of my best interviews ever. Chris is articulate and witty, and he cares a lot for his fans. Though I didn’t hyperventilate, meeting Chris Claremont is one of the highlights of my life. And it happened at Rhode Island Comic-Con.

The rest of the convention was as you might expect. Dunkin Donuts Center is a basketball arena, which makes it an odd venue for a convention. The dealer room was on the court, which was roomy, but some of the celebrities were tucked away in what looked like janitor closets. Know who had the longest signing lines that I saw? Tom Kenny and Bill Fagerbakke—you know, SpongeBob and Patrick, which confirms my theory that the next growth market for collectors is 1990s memorabilia.

There were few fan-led panels, which disappointed John. Such panels were the seed of conventions back in the 1970s, but they are in danger of disappearing in this bigger-is-better era. John likes the panels. He considers himself a fan but not a super-fan. The super-fan award goes to the girl I saw at Jim Beaver’s table. Tears streaked her teenaged face, and after she and her mother walked away, they stopped and hugged as though a dog had died.

Friends, that is fandom. That is love. Wil Wheaton says that the defining characteristic of being a nerd is that “we love things. Some of us love Firefly and some of us love Game of Thrones, or Star Trek, or Star Wars, or anime, or games, or fantasy, or science fiction. Some of us love completely different things. But we all love those things SO much that we travel for thousands of miles … we come from all over the world, so that we can be around people who love the things the way that we love them.”

Rhode Island was a great place to go for love. The convention is young, so I have no doubt they will work out the problems of limited space and no maps and unreliable celebs. Every staff member I saw, every volunteer I talked to, was a delight, which confirms what Susan Soares told me in the beginning.

So if you have the chance, go to Rhode Island Comic-Con next November. Buy your badge early. Study the schedule. Stay hydrated. It will be one of your best shows all year.

_______________________

karen line

John and I weren’t the only attendees.

deadpool

This guy was also there. Wait, he’s at every convention!

knight

Due to the no-weapons policy, this guy wasn’t allowed to be armed.

chris

Chris Claremont signs my comic.

fonz

The Fonz tells me to leave the convention.

lost

Whoops! This isn’t the way to the men’s room.

metatron

An angel just below my shoulder.

contest

Various winners from Saturday night’s costume contest, which had 70-80 total entries.

catwoman

“You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours.”

Bobby

Jim Beaver asked me where I am from. “North Carolina,” I said. He nodded and said, “That explains it.” I wanted to say, “Right. Like Bobby Singer doesn’t have a rural accent!”

groot

John and Groot, not seeing eye-to-eye.

tardis

“Uh, Doctor? I think you regenerated a little too far back.”

lois

This gal is a great little Kidder.

cosplay repair

Not something you see at most conventions, but a good idea.

doctor

This guy also shows up at every convention. It’s like he has a time machine or something.

DragonCon 2015 Report (with an Interview with Caroll Spinney)!

DragonCon log
It started with my friend John, whom you may remember as my sometime convention companion. He was with me at Minneapolis Wizard World and at Spooky Empire in Orlando, where we discussed the popularity of horror movies while waiting to meet Tobin Bell.

Back in 2011, John sent me an email that read, “Son, look at this.” John and I have called each other “son” for twenty years. It’s our oldest invention, the stone tools of our friendship. His email included a link to a convention called DragonCon, which I was unfamiliar with. “We should go to this to watch all the freaks,” he went on. “We’d have the time of our lives!”

We went to DragonCon that year, plus the next two. In 2014, John was unavailable, so I took my wife and daughter, who went with me again this year, marking my fifth Labor Day weekend spent in Atlanta, Georgia.

* * *

DragonCon has been held in the Dogwood City since 1986, when it was started by a science fiction and gaming group, the Dragon Alliance of Gamers and Role-Players (DAGR). From the outset, it was different. In an era when most conventions focused on a single universe (Star Wars, Star Trek, Doctor Who) or medium (comics, games, science fiction), DragonCon was founded as a multi-genre convention, and it has remained one ever since.

That first gathering drew 1,400 fans and featured some surprisingly renowned guests: Robert Asprin, Lynn Abbey, Michael Moorcock, and the band Blue Öyster Cult. Attendance grew every year, doubling in some years. By 1995, it was at 14,000. It topped 40,000 in 2010, and in 2015, just five years later, over 65,000 were expected. Heck, there are now more volunteers (2,300+) than inaugural attendees!

Most gatherings of that size take place in convention centers, but DragonCon is still hotel-based. Initially confined to the Piedmont Plaza, it now swamps five four-star venues: the Hilton, Hyatt Regency, Marriott Marquis, Sheraton, and Westin. Vendor booths are located in a sixth building, the AmericasMart. Over 3,000 hours of programming are spread among those hotels, divided into fortysomething tracks. Tracks such as comics and Tolkien are the DNA of DragonCon. Others like podcasting, Whedon Universe, and filking are newer. The curriculum is always changing, always improving, according to Dan Carroll, DragonCon’s director of media. The alternate history track, for example, was added seven years ago when a panel on the topic was planned for 400 people. Over 3,000 showed up.

I went to one panel this year. Cacophonously titled “Legendary SW Authors Talk Mythos,” it featured four writers—Rebecca Moesta, Timothy Zahn, Michael Stackpole, and Kevin J. Anderson—who have totaled no fewer than 50 Star Wars novels. To call these authors “legendary” carries a double meaning, as their works, like others of the Star Wars Expanded Universe, are no longer canon thanks to a 2014 Lucasfilm decree. (This article describes the new continuity in detail.)

The authors talked about this decision, not to bellyache but to explain that it isn’t the degradation most fans seem to think. They knew from the start that they were scribblers, hired to tell tales from someone else’s world. They didn’t feel betrayed; they felt lucky for the opportunities. After all, it isn’t just any world—it is Star Wars, one of the best worlds in this, or any, universe. Besides, there is nothing to stop Lucasfilm from taking their work—say, Michael Stackpole’s X-Wing books—and turning it into a separate movie or TV series, a possibility hinted at during last year’s San Diego Comic-Con.

The panelists discussed other topics, including their tastes in stories (westerns, Doc Savage, Edgar Rice Burroughs, and fortuitously, romances like Gone with the Wind), what influenced them as writers, and how they collaborate. It was a fascinating colloquy despite the feebleness of the moderator, a supposed Star Wars blogger whose questions were rambling and confused the panelists. One question had already been answered by Stackpole, and after the moderator asked it, Kevin J. Anderson said, “Mike, you want to run through that again?” The moderator smiled, turned to the audience, and said, “Never mind. We’ll take your questions now.”

* * *

One of the biggest attractions of DragonCon is the Walk of Fame, where all the TV, movie, gaming, and other guests interact with fans. Over 400 guests attended this year, a few of them household names: Stephen Amell, John Barrowman, Katie Cassidy, Karen Gillan, Nichelle Nichols, and Edward James Olmos. I wanted to interview some guests, a process DragonCon manages better than most conventions. Reporters who are granted press passes must be separately approved for interviews. These approvals are based on the size of their media outlets. Once I got my approval, I could request interviews with up to ten guests.

With over 500 interview requests for 114 slots (according to Samantha Douglas, the interview coordinator), not every reporter approved for interviews actually gets one. Imagine my surprise when I was offered two: one with Sylvester McCoy, who played the Seventh Doctor on Dr. Who, and one with Caroll Spinney, who played Big Bird and Oscar the Grouch on Sesame Street. The interviews were actually press conferences held in one of the Marriott meeting rooms. About twelve reporters were at each one. Most represented nerd-news sites like ConventionScene, though I also saw CNN and Georgia Public Broadcasting.

Through no fault of DragonCon, the press conferences were disasters. After we waited thirty minutes for Sylvester McCoy, someone came in to say that he was cancelling. His panel had run long, and because he was leaving that afternoon, there was no time to reschedule. Carol Spinney was over an hour late (he simply forgot) and stayed only about ten minutes. Here is a bit of what he had to say:

Reporter: I heard in other interviews that you based Big Bird on a four-year-old child. Over the years, have you had to adjust your characterization of that four-year-old child version of Big Bird based on the generations?

Spinney: Actually, initially, since I decided Big Bird could not read or write, he was four-and-a-half. Then I had to go up to six. And now he has been six for years. He is a precocious child of six. He travels by himself with a dog. And he went to China, somehow. I don’t know how he got tickets. I think it’s just fun playing him as a kind of wide-eyed child. I get letters all the time from children saying, “Big Bird, you’re my best friend. Please come and play with me.” One said, “How about next Thursday?”

Reporter: When the movie [Follow That Bird, 1985] came out, Big Bird had already been around for a while, and a whole generation of children had been watching him and relating to him as a friend, and kids really felt that their friend had been kidnapped. Were you expecting Big Bird to connect to a whole country of children at that deep of a level?

Spinney: I didn’t really know what to expect. When Jim Henson hired me, we were both puppeteers. I would do whatever characters needed performing, but by the third year, with Big Bird, I was so busy. They tried to have me continue doing the incidental stuff too, but one day, Big Bird was in almost all the scenes, and I had to keep taking a taxi up and down Broadway [performing as different characters in different scenes], so one day I said, “Let’s not play this game anymore.” On the fourth year, I said I was busy enough that we needed more puppeteers. So we got some more.

Reporter: I saw that you visited the Center for Puppetry Arts yesterday. Can you talk about what you saw and did there?

Spinney: Well, the museum is going to open by November. They have so many things to display. I saw the place where they are building and repairing puppets, a lot of the Henson puppets that are worn-out. Some of the material has decayed. It has turned to powder. The only puppet I ever created myself is one that has gone to pieces. It was Bruno, who carried Oscar’s trash can around. There were fake arms going to Bruno’s shoulders, and my hands were inside. Oscar would come up and try to boss him around, but Bruno would not be bossed. I designed Bruno so that my head was in his head. I could see out through where the bags under his eyes would be. He looked like a Bert-type puppet. That way, we could get Oscar out on stage for concert tours. I asked a couple of years ago why we don’t use Bruno in shows anymore. He doesn’t exist. He has turned to powder. I asked why they don’t make a new one. It would cost $20,000, so good-bye, Bruno.

Reporter: You are an animator as well. Are you planning on making any future animations?

Spinney: Not really. After four years of doing it in Boston, I kind of got tired of it. I was glad it didn’t have to be my permanent career. I was hired by Disney Studios to be an animator, though I didn’t take the job. This was 1957, and the pay was only $56 a week for the first two years. I decided I’d try for something different, so I did. Walt [Disney] actually walked into the room during my interview. I never actually got to speak to him. I had always had a bucket list of three people I would like to meet: Andrew Wyeth, who I spent an afternoon with once and his son Jamie; Walt Disney—at least I was in the same room with him, and I turned his company down; and the other one was Jim Henson, who personally hired me. So I guess I accomplished all those.

Spinney
Caroll Spinney in the interview room

* * *

Suppose you are thinking of going to DragonCon in 2016, which will be its 30th anniversary. What do you need to know?

  •  Book early. Tickets are plentiful, but the hotels fill up fast. The marketing manager at the Hyatt told me that it takes fifteen minutes to sell his 1,250 guest rooms for DragonCon weekend.
  • Prepare to wait. You will wait for autographs. You will wait for panels. You will wait for the Heroes & Villains ball or the DragonCon Burlesque or panels with the biggest celebrities. Heck, you will wait for an elevator or a restroom. Get used to it.
  • Pay in cash. I have a dream that someday the DragonCon decision-makers will realize they need to mail pre-paid badges. What’s the point of buying online when you have to pick them up in-person? This means 65,000 people standing in line. Yes, registration starts on Thursday, but this benefits only those who buy a weekend pass. Those who want a one-day pass on Saturday can only buy it on Saturday and must pick it up on-site, even if they paid online. You may as well pay for a one-day on-site, and if you do, pay cash. The cash line is terribly shorter and faster than the credit card line.
  •  Account for the parade. A highlight of the weekend is the Saturday parade, which starts at 10:00am and stretches through downtown. Over 80,000 people show up to watch, making it the second largest parade in the state of Georgia (the first is the Savannah St. Patrick’s Day Parade). Along the parade route, every inch of sidewalk bears a geeky gawker. It’s like a Marvel mosh pit, so plan accordingly. I heard one woman complaining that she had missed her Saturday morning photo op (which she had paid for) because she could not reach the hotel through the throng.
  •  Schedules are bunk. The program you are handed at registration contains a detailed schedule for the entire weekend. It is outdated the moment it is printed. There is a smartphone app that is kept current, but even it is not omniscient. For example, when I entered the Walk of Fame on Saturday, I saw a handwritten sign taped above Karen Gillan’s booth announcing that she would arrive on Sunday. DC Comics luminary George Perez left at 1:00pm on Saturday, and that was announced only when his signing line was cut off at noon. And I’ve already mentioned the press conference bloopers. Bottom line: No one can manage a convention of this heft flawlessly, so be flexible. Don’t have a meltdown when something goes awry.
  • Take care of yourself. Dan Carroll calls DragonCon an “immersive experience.” This can be dreadful if you don’t manage it. He told me about an attendee some years back, a diabetic, who fainted during a session in the gaming room. She told the EMT who restored her that she hadn’t eaten in two hours. “When did you last eat?” the EMT asked. “Around 2:00,” the woman answered. The EMT looked at her and said, “Honey, it’s now 11:00.”

Six buildings. 65,000 attendees. 2,400 volunteers. A $55 million economic impact. You may have attended conventions in the past, but none compares to DragonCon, one of the United States’ largest and most venerable. Nowhere is this more evident than in the cosplays, which are more sumptuous than those you’ll see anywhere. Check them out for yourself below. Maybe I’ll see you there next year, when I plan to be dressed like this.

* * *

twenties DC

Gotham City’s underworld, circa 1925

Big Trouble

I didn’t want trouble, but these guys brought it. Big trouble.

Star Wars

George Lucas’s first casting attempt

Toucan

Here’s Sam. Where’s Dean?

Surfer

It’s always hot in Georgia in early September. Some people respond by practically going nude.

Scooby gang

Who you gonna call? Sorry, wrong ghostbusters.

scooby villains

Maybe Mystery Inc. was looking for these guys. I found them instead.

Barbie

I went to DragonCon looking for a life-size Barbie doll. Here it is.

Steampunk ood

This was a ood cosplay . . . I mean, a good cosplay.

Kermit & Piggy

An impromptu Muppet Show breaks out.

Hangover

I found a baby once. Then this guy took him from me.

Deadpool

Preach it, Deadpool. Preach it.

crowd

Want to know what 3,000+ cosplayers in a parade look like? Here’s a glimpse.

Wife and daughter

Want to know what happens when my wife and daughter spend an entire weekend together? Here’s a glimpse.

Wizard World Adds Comic Con Orlando in August 2016

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Press Release:

Wizard World Comic Con Orlando Added To Largest Pop Culture Convention Schedule, August 5-7, 2016

Inaugural Event Set For Orange County Convention Center

ORLANDO, Fla., June 3, 2015 – Wizard World, Inc. (OTCBB: WIZD) today announced the addition of Wizard World Comic Con Orlando to its 2016 schedule. The inaugural event will be held August 5-7 at the Orange County Convention Center.

Celebrity and comics creator guests and other details about the event will be announced as they are confirmed..

Wizard World has 26 events scheduled on its 2015 calendar. Confirmed events for 2015 and 2016 are available at www.wizardworld.com/wizcon.html. Along with Albuquerque, N.M., and Greenville, S.C., Orlando is one of three inaugural shows to date scheduled for 2016 Wizard World debuts.

Wizard World Comic Con events bring together thousands of fans of all ages to celebrate the best in pop-fi, pop culture, movies, graphic novels, cosplay, comics, television, sci-fi, toys, video gaming, gaming, original art, collectibles, contests and more. Wizard World Comic Con Orlando show hours are tentatively set for Friday, August 5, 2016, 3-8 p.m.; Saturday, August 6, 2016, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; and Sunday, August 7, 2016, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

Wizard World Comic Con Orlando is also the place for cosplay, with fans young and old showing off their best costumes throughout the event. Fans dressed as every imaginable character – and some never before dreamed – will roam the convention floor.

For more on the 2016 Wizard World Comic Con Orlando, visit www.wizardworld.com/home-orlando.html.

Ryan Stegman to Appear at Grand Rapids Comic-Con in October 2015

Spider-Man

Press Release:

“The Amazing Spider-Man” Artist Ryan Stegman To Appear at Grand Rapids Comic-Con

The Amazing Spider-Man artist Ryan Stegman will be at the Grand Rapids Comic-Con on October 16-18 at the DeVos Place in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Ryan’s first art job was to do covers for Markosia including Starship Troopers and Midnight Kiss. He then found himself at Marvel working as the penciller and inker for the series Magician Apprentice in which he contributed from 2006-2009.

Ryan signed an exclusivity agreement with Marvel in 2010. Ryan did various work for Marvel for titles such as Thor, The Incredible Hulk, Sif, and X-23 before his memorable work on the “Man Hunt” series for She-Hulks.

In 2011, Ryan did work on the Fear Itself: Deadpool series before becoming an artist for The Amazing Spider-Man series as well as assorted off-shoots. Ryan also drew for Superior Spider-Man and Scarlet Spider series during that time, both of which having direct ties to the death of Peter Parker.

Ryan has also contributed to numerous other Marvel series, including Fantastic Four, Avengers Vs. X-Men, and Moon Knight. His most recent work is included in the “Rogue Logan” series for Wolverine.

Ryan is also regular cover artist for both Zenescope Entertainment and BOOM Studios.

“Ryan Stegman is one of the best known artists in the field today,” said event director Mark Hodges. “Ryan unfortunately had to cancel on us last year due to the weather, and we are more than happy to have him back.”

The third Grand Rapids Comic-Con will be held on October 16-18, 2015, at the DeVios Place in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Other artist guests include Green Lantern scribe Ethan Van Sciver, My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic writer Katie Cook, and Green Arrow: The Longbow Hunters artist Mike Grell. For more information go to www.grcomiccon.com.

Wizard World Comic Con Albuquerque Rescheduled To June 2016

Wizard World

Press Release:

Wizard World Comic Con Albuquerque To Be Rescheduled To June 24-26, 2016

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M., May 22, 2015 – Wizard World, Inc. (OTCBB: WIZD) today announced that Wizard World Comic Con Albuquerque will be postponed until June 24-26, 2016. A timing conflict with the concurrent Wizard World Comic Con Sacramento, June 19-21, 2015, and late introduction of the show just last month are the primary reasons cited for the rescheduling of the 2015 event.

Refunds will be automatically issued to those who had already purchased admissions, photo ops and autographs. In addition, those individuals will receive free admission to the 2016 event.

Wizard World regrets the inconvenience and looks forward to providing the full Wizard World experience for its Albuquerque show next year. The company is appreciative of the cooperation of the Albuquerque Convention Center, area hotels and other partners in accommodating the new schedule.

About Wizard World, Inc. (OTCBB: WIZD)
Wizard World, Inc. (http://www.wizardworld.com) produces Comic Cons and pop culture conventions across North America that celebrate the best in pop-fi, pop culture, movies, television, cosplay, comics, graphic novels, toys, video gaming, sci-fi, gaming, original art, collectibles, contests and more. A first-class lineup of topical programming takes place at each event, with celebrity Q&A’s, comics-themed sessions, costume contests, movie screenings, evening parties and more. Wizard World has also launched CONtv, a digital media channel in partnership with leading independent content distributor Cinedigm™ (NASDAQ: CIDM), and ComicConBox™, a premium subscription-based monthly box service. Fans can interact with Wizard World on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram and other social media services.

The 2015 Wizard World Comic Con schedule is available at www.wizardworld.com/wizcon.html.

Wizard World Comic Con Raleigh 2015 Report! (Including an Interview with Kevin Sorbo)

Back in the fall of 2014, when I saw that Wizard World, that latter-day arbiter of pop culture sensibilities, was having its first-ever convention in Raleigh, North Carolina on March 13-15, I thought, Cool. I had been to the Minneapolis and Chicago shows, traveling hundreds of miles to write about each (see here and here, respectively). Raleigh is only 45 minutes from my house.

When I later saw that William Shatner would be at Raleigh Wizard World, I thought, Sweet. Who better than the Captain to explore this strange, new world? I watched as more excellent guests were announced—Sean Astin, John Schneider, Kevin Sorbo. And when I saw Rob Liefeld, the creator of Deadpool, added to the list, I thought, Awesome! Liefeld is one of the hottest comic artists of the last twenty years. I need some more stuff signed by him.

And when I received an email on February 24 from Wizard World’s PR person telling me that Doctor Who’s David Tennant would be in Raleigh, I thought, Oh. My. God.

David Tennant! No offense to other guests, but this was huge. Poll after poll shows him as the most popular Doctor among Whovians (see here, here, and here). Tennant’s Doctor is charming, funny, and passionate. Christopher Eccleston, the Ninth Doctor, did the hard work of rebooting the twenty-year-dead series in 2005; Tennant presided over its expansion both in the UK and across the pond. Plus he is a rarity on the convention circuit. Raleigh would be, in fact, his Wizard World debut (his second appearance will be in Philadelphia this May).

I am a middling Doctor Who fan. My wife and daughter? Rabid. And their favorite, of course, is David Tennant. My wife makes and sells fandom-related jewelry, and she had another convention that weekend in Winston-Salem, about two hours away. Urban Dictionary defines fandom as “a cult that will destroy your life”; I prefer to think of it as the impetus for restructuring your life on the fly. Thus, after much wrangling and a pair of David Tennant VIP tickets ($399 each!), we settled on the following schedule:

Friday: My wife and me at Wizard World, our daughter at the Winston-Salem convention

Saturday: All of us at the Winston convention

Sunday: My wife and my daughter at Wizard World to see David Tennant, me at the Winston convention

Actually, my weekend started on Thursday, at the Wizard World launch party. It was held at the Marbles Kids Museum in downtown Raleigh.

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Advertisements for the party indicated that celebrities (plural) would be in attendance, though the only one I saw was Kevin Sorbo, star of the 90s hit series Hercules. Still, we had a nice chat:

Me: You have been in several faith-based movies [What If . . . and God’s Not Dead]. What is it about these movies that speaks to people?

Kevin: There are a lot of people who have faith. All the polls show like 80% of people believe in God. We tend to skim over that, and Hollywood doesn’t put out movies that deal with that. And when they do, they sort of bastardize it. Look what they did with Exodus. Look what they did with Noah, for crying out loud. Why would you hire atheist directors to do something out of the Old Testament? It’s weird to me.

Me: The emphasis there seems to be more on special effects.

Kevin: Yeah. We went to a private screening of Noah, and my wife said, “This is like Transformers meets Water World.” Visually, it’s beautiful, but you’re like, does the Bible talk about Noah being schizophrenic, alcoholic, and hell-bent on killing his own family at the end?

Me: You’ve had a varied career, but of course you’re most known for Hercules . . .

Kevin: Yeah, that and Andromeda.

Me: Right. How did your role in Hercules come about?

Kevin: It was a typical audition through Hollywood. My agent called me up and said, “They’re casting five Hercules movies, and they want to see you.” I said, “I’m a big guy, but don’t they want some steroid dude with no neck or some bodybuilder who weighs 280 pounds?” He said, “No, they’re looking for an athletic-looking, sort-of decathlon, Joe Namath-type quarterback.” So I went and read. They called me back and called me back. Seven times they called me back. I was up in Vancouver, Canada filming an episode of The Commish, and they called me and said, “You’re Hercules.” I thought it was going to be five two-hour movies. Then, boom! It became a series, and it passed Baywatch to become the most-watched show in the world.

Me: Before filming, how did you get into the role? How did you prepare yourself to play a mythical hero?

Kevin: It was all in the writing. They made the character very 90s. It was a very Malibu sort of Hercules. He was very hip and accessible and approachable, very self-effacing. There was a lot of humor. The fight scenes were never very violent. Our spin-off show, Xena, was a much more violent show, killing guys. We never killed a guy.

Me: Speaking of writing, you did a book a couple of years ago. What was that like?

Kevin: It’s been great because of the number of speaking appearances I get. I did a dozen last year, and I’ve already got about eleven more lined up this year. It’s been amazing to get out there and do all the talking I’ve been doing about the book, which is about a health scare I suffered. I was the healthiest-looking guy in the world in the 90s, and I had three strokes and almost died. It took me out of the show [Hercules] for four months. We had to re-write everything.

Me: Which is harder, writing or acting?

Kevin [laughs]: I think writing is much harder. Writers take much of the blame for everything in Hollywood, so God bless them. It’s the toughest job around.

Me: How did you get started doing conventions?

Kevin: You know, conventions really didn’t kick off until about fifteen years ago. The growth has been astronomical. In the 90s, comic cons weren’t that big. They were around, but there wasn’t the publicity and the push and the hype. I got invited during the 90s, but I could do only one or two a year because I was in New Zealand ten months out of the year [filming Hercules]. Now, I go to a lot around the world. I’m doing two in April in Australia. I have one coming up in Belgium. I get invited to about five a month, and I go to six or seven a year.

Me: Are there things you won’t do for fans? Are there lines fans try to get you to cross that you push back against?

Kevin: Not really. Women have not exposed their breasts to me, but they have wanted me to sign the top of their chests. Some people get very nervous because they know you from TV, and now they’re seeing you in the flesh. It’s a surreal moment for them, and I get that because when I first moved to L.A., I started meeting some of the celebrities I used to watch on TV, and I was like, “Wow. That’s really him standing there.” For me, it was Anthony Quinn [who played Zeus in Hercules]. Meeting him blew me away.

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The next night, Friday, was my night at Wizard World. It is often said that Wizard World, with its deep pockets and runaway costs, delights in squeezing out local conventions. See, for example, this article decrying “William Shatner at $199 an autograph,” which is ludicrously inflated. Shatner charges less than half that amount, and he has charged it for years.

What has changed, and not for the better, is the number of comic book artists who now charge for an autograph. Michael Golden charged $10. Dean Haspiel (who?) charged $10. Tom DeFalco gave one or two free signatures, but he charged after that due to, as the sign on his table exhorted, the miserable capitalists who sell his stuff on eBay.

And Rob Liefeld. When I saw him in 2012, he charged $20 to sign copies of New Mutants #87 (first appearance of Cable) or #98 (first appearance of Deadpool). Everything else was free. Now he charges $30 for any Deadpool item, $20 for any New Mutants or X-Force issue, and $20 for any book being witnessed by CGC. He’s still a cool guy, though, and he did not charge me for this picture.

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I get that writers and artists are trying to make a living. A market exists for their autographs that they did not create and are merely tapping into. But their judgment—or is jealousy?—of collectors feels wrong-headed. eBay does not lower payments to creators (a buyer’s market does that) nor deprive them of ownership of their work (publishers retain this). Besides, CGC’s fees are rich enough. To pay an extra $20 for the signature hurts.

Perhaps it was this increase in signing fees that was responsible for the small crowd.

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Or the fact that few celebrities showed up for opening night (aside from Tony Stark).

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The dealer’s room was livelier, but what struck me most there was the dearth of comic book dealers. I counted two. The rest had toys, decals, T-shirts, etc. Curiously, there were also the Lasik Vision Institute and the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, giving the dealer’s room a festival-in-the-park feel. I left without buying anything (or scheduling eye surgery).

I tried to buy a third David Tennant autograph ticket for Sunday, the day my wife and daughter would be there, for my daughter’s friend. But they were not selling any more tickets until Sunday morning—possibly (as it turned out, they didn’t have more then, either). “It’s the first time we’ve worked with him,” said the apologetic young woman, “and we’re not sure what to expect.” Translation: they had under-prepared. Wizard World has remedied this (sort of) for Philadelphia, making David Tennant photos and autographs available only to VIP ticket buyers. It’s an imperfect solution: a limited quantity of tickets at a cost that prices a lot of people out of contention. But at least they won’t run out by the first day of the con.

So my daughter’s friend lost out. My wife and daughter, however, racked up, each of them receiving (1) any item autographed, (2) a professional photo-op, (3) a David Tennant collector’s card, (4) other Doctor Who stuff, and (5) a limited edition Walking Dead comic book with a black-and-white sketch cover by Dean Haspiel (so that’s who he is!). And they got into the Tennant Q&A, which, we found out, was open only to VIPs because the room was so small. (My question: why didn’t they rearrange the rooms? It’s David Tennant. You can bump the Harry Potter fan fiction panel to a snack bar table.)

If the crowd was meager on Friday, it had Hulked up by Sunday. There were 500 VIP ticket holders that day (600 on Saturday), plus who knows how many who managed to get a one-day autograph or photo ticket before they were sold out. My wife took over 100 pictures during the Q&A, enough to allow us to play a game called The Many Faces of David Tennant.

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David ponders why the TARDIS isn’t cleaner on the inside.

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David does his Gilbert Gottfried impression.

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David whistles “Dixie,” because he’s in the South.

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David tries to hypnotize the crowd but puts himself to sleep.

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This is David Tennant, not David Bowie.

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“Blimey, Rose! I told you to close the TARDIS door before take-off!”

Tennant is surprised at how popular Doctor Who has become in the United States—surprised but pleased. Asked about his acting career, he said he likes the variety of roles (in his new drama, Broadchurch, he plays a character as far from the Doctor as you can imagine). Whom would he cosplay as at a convention? “Someone with a mask, so I could enjoy the convention.” One questioner recommended that he try the barbecue before leaving North Carolina. This apparently led to a discussion of food in which he dissed American bacon (too dry and crunchy).  Another asked him who he fanboys over. Answer: Marvel Comics, which he had recently toured.

After the Q&A came photos, and about an hour after that, the signing line started. When my daughter reached the table, she asked Tennant if she could record him saying hello to her friend (the one who got gypped on the autograph). Most celebs won’t do this, but in the absence of an advertised prohibition, it doesn’t hurt to ask. Astonishingly, he agreed! Then a Wizard World staffer stepped in and put a stop to it. Normally, I would rail against this, but the staffer had a point. If Tennant did that for my daughter, he would have to do it for everyone, which would slow the line to a crawl. The lesson for convention goers is this: guests aren’t being rude or aloof when they refuse some of your requests. The refusal may simply be a matter of convention policy.

So the inaugural Wizard World Raleigh was a success. Great city, great guests, friendly service—and the Doctor. One woman my wife talked to had driven eight hours from Alabama with her two kids to see him. On top of the arm-and-leg-ness of VIP tickets, this struck me as insanely devoted. “Would you do that?” I asked my wife on Monday as she stared out the kitchen window, a melancholy smile on her face. “Yes,” she said without hesitation. “Yes I would.”

Well-played, Wizard World. Well-played.

 

Scene and Reviewed: Clarence: Mystery Pinata; Steven Universe: Gem Glow

Dexter’s Laboratory. Johnny Bravo. The Powerpuff Girls. Cow and Chicken. Ben 10. Samurai Jack. Ed, Edd n Eddy. Camp Lazlo. For over twenty years, Cartoon Network has provided original programs that are now considered classics. Young adults look back fondly on the series. Kids cosplay as the characters. Every time I take my daughter into Hot Topic (with a hat pulled over my eyes, not to keep from being recognized, but because, to the target audience, I don’t belong), I see familiar faces adorning shirts, shoes, notebooks, lunch boxes, lip balm, and lots of other stuff. Now the network has released DVDs of two new series, Clarence and Steven Universe. Will they, too, become part of the national zeitgeist?

Clarence

Previewed at the 2013 San Diego Comic-Con and debuting the following year, Clarence tells the story of Clarence Wendell, a fourth-grade boy with an unusual trait in these postmodern times: he sees the good in everybody. His best friends are Jeff Randell and Ryan “Sumo” Sumozski. Jeff is brainy and aloof (hence, the square-shaped head), while Sumo is the spaz of the trio. Series creator Skyler Page worked on the industry juggernaut Adventure Time, and Clarence sports a similar style and absurd humor. Critics like the show, which will appeal more to younger kids than teens. Adult viewers may be disappointed with this DVD, however, which has only 12 episodes, less than half of the 29 that have aired. The pilot episode is present, but there are few special features–no commentary or deleted scenes, and no creator interview (which makes sense: Page was fired from the show back in July). Still, the episodes are entertaining, if not clever, and at roughly 13 minutes each, you can watch one while cooking Kraft Mac & Cheese. Always a plus.

Steven Universe

Steven Universe is a little older, premiering on November 4, 2013. Created by Rebecca Sugar (another Adventure Time alum!), the show has a more action-oriented plot than Clarence. Steven is the youngest member of a group of warriors called the Crystal Gems. Drawing their power from four mystical gemstones–garnet, amethyst, pearl, and rose quartz–the team hangs around the town of Beach City, racking up one cool adventure after another. Occasionally, they do something heroic, such as using a laser to destroy a giant, menacing red eye, but more often, Steven’s troubles are, beneath their sci-fi veneer, pretty typical. In one episode, he forms a magic bubble to protect a would-be girlfriend, Connie, from a falling rock, but then he can’t make the bubble disappear. This is just like childhood: getting in over your head with no real plan how to get out. Perhaps it is this universality of theme that has made Steven Universe a hit with critics and viewers alike. One quibble: the 12 episodes on the DVD are not episodes 1-12 but a random assortment. Because each episode builds on the next, watching them out of order is not the ideal way to experience this highly enjoyable show.

Clarence episodes

1. Fun Dungeon Face Off

2. Pretty Great Day with a Girl

3. Lost in the Supermarket

4. Clarence’s Millions

5. Jeff’s New Toy

6. Zoo

7. Rise ‘n’ Shine

8. Average Jeff

9. Slumber Party

10. Dream Boat

11. Too Gross for Comfort

12. Neighborhood Grill

Steven Universe episodes

1. Laser Light Cannon (originally episode 2)

2. Gem Glow (originally episode 1)

3. Cat Fingers (originally episode 6)

4. Bubble Buddies (originally episode 7)

5. Tiger Millionaire (originally episode 9)

6. Steven’s Lion (originally episode 10)

7. Onion Trade (originally episode 15)

8. Giant Woman (originally episode 12)

9. Lars and the Cool Kids (originally episode 14)

10. Rose’s Room (originally episode 19)

11. Beach Party (originally episode 18)

12. Steven and the Steven (originally episode 22)

About Cartoon Network

Cartoon Network (CartoonNetwork.com) is regularly the #1 U.S. television network in prime among boys 6-11 and 9-14. Currently seen in 97 million U.S. homes and 194 countries around the world, Cartoon Network is Turner Broadcasting System, Inc.’s ad-supported cable service now available in HD offering the best in original, acquired and classic entertainment for kids and families. In addition to Emmy-winning original programming and industry-leading digital apps and online games, Cartoon Network embraces key social issues affecting families with solution-oriented initiatives such as Stop Bullying: Speak Up and Move it Movement.

Turning Broadcasting System, Inc., a Time Warner company, creates and programs branded news, entertainment, animation and young adult media environments on television and other platforms for consumers around the world.

 

Bruce Campbell to Host “Last Fan Standing” Game Show for CONtv

LastFanStanding_Logo_2015-01-07

Press Release:

POP CULTURE ICON BRUCE CAMPBELL TO HOST NEW ORIGINAL SERIES “LAST FAN STANDING” FOR UPCOMING DIGITAL NETWORK CONTV

Cinedigm And Wizard World’s New Network To Launch This February With Fan-Favorite Film, TV And Original Entertainment Geared Towards the Comic Con Community

JANUARY 9, 2015, LOS ANGELES, CA – The forthcoming digital streaming service CONtv has announced it will be kicking off production for a new original series, LAST FAN STANDING, a game show hosted and produced by fan-favorite actor Bruce Campbell (The Evil Dead, Army Of Darkness). Created in partnership with Pop Quiz Entertainment, the series will be filmed live on the ground at Comic Con conventions nationwide with first show taping on Saturday, January 10 at New Orleans Comic Con. LAST FAN STANDING engages event attendees through a proprietary audience response system, where all patrons play along, competing for cash and prizes. The show culminates with the top four players vying for the coveted title as Campbell hunts for the LAST FAN STANDING.

Scheduled to launch next month, CONtv is a joint venture between Cinedigm, a leading independent content distributor, and Wizard World, a leading producer of live pop culture multimedia conventions. LAST FAN STANDINGwill be shot throughout various Wizard World events throughout 2015, and will premiere on CONtv later this year.

Wonder how much Thor’s hammer weighs? Or how much damage the Vorpal blade would inflict on a 5th-Level Cleric? Fans finally find vindication in their hours studying comics, films, movies and more with host and horror icon Campbell in this outrageous new quiz show. A collaboration between his own production entity and Pop Quiz Entertainment, this will be Campbells first digital series.

At a live preview during Wizard Worlds Chicago Comic Con last August, six hundred screaming fans could barely hold their seats! It was obvious to us that this would be a hit, said Chris McGurk, CEO of Cinedigm Entertainment. With a host as beloved in the fan community as Bruce, theres no better fit for CONtv than LAST FAN STANDING.We think of this series as a celebration of the pop culture obsession and fan engagement that makes the CONtv audience so special.

The audience went crazy for LAST FAN STANDING when we debuted the game at Chicago Comic Con this summer! CONtv is the perfect place to reach true fans, and we can’t wait to challenge our audiences to find out who is the ultimate pop culture guru,said Campbell.

We love that CONtv will be bringing the excitement and action of our conventions to fans across the country,says John Macaluso, CEO of Wizard World. By shooting LAST FAN STANDING on location, CONtv viewers will be able to join in on the fan experience even when they arent able to be at the convention in person.

Steve Sellery, CEO of Pop Quiz Entertainment commented, We created LAST FAN STANDING to celebrate the excitement and the fandom of each audience member, while providing them the chance to compete in a live game show. This truly is a unique and highly experiential platform that we trust will become a fan favoritewell into the future.

The new series joins the recently announced FIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD, a horror-competition series from Alpine Labs, BlackBoxTV and Revolver Picture Company. An unprecedented mash-up of the reality and scripted genres, FIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD follows a collection of online celebrities including Joey Graceffa, Jesse and Jeana (PrankvsPrank), Justine Ezarik (iJustine), and more, as they face challenges in an attempt to survive the undeads relentlessly grisly, and frighteningly realistic onslaught.

Additionally, CONtv also recently announced an expansive portfolio of acquired film and television content available on the new digital network. Carefully selected for the passionate fans that make up the CONtv audience, the new partnerships enable the network to carry a deep catalogue of the best in pop culture obsession from pulse-pounding horror, to short-lived TV series, to cult classic films.

Upon its launch in February 2015, the digital service will be offered as a free ad-supported platform as well as a low-cost monthly subscription of $6.99/month with content exclusives, audience rewards, a dynamic second-screen experience, and ticketing bundle opportunities for Wizard World conventions. CONtv plans to launch across a wide spectrum of devices including Roku, Apple TV, Chromecast, Xbox, PlayStation, Android, Samsung Smart TV, Windows, Mac OS, mobile, and tablet devices.

About CONtv

CONtv is a new digital entertainment network exclusively dedicated to the fanspace. Launching in early 2015, CONtv will offer audiences access to thousands of hours of original programming, elusive cult films and television shows, celebrated genre movies, and exclusive live coverage of Comic Con events nationwide. From quirky original series to an eclectic catalog of 1200 must-watch titles, CONtvs seemingly endless stream of animé, fantasy, grindhouse, horror, martial arts, sci-fi, and superhero content will be available on demand through a free, ad-supported format or a low-cost, subscription-based model of $6.99 a month for premium content. CONtv is a partnership of Cinedigm Entertainment Group, the nations largest independent distributor of digital entertainment, and Wizard World, producers of the largest chain of Comic Con and pop culture conventions in the U.S. Together, they provide an unrivalled experiential hub of content, community, and conventions across the broad spectrum of platforms including Android, Apple TV, Chromecast, Mac OS, PlayStation, Roku, Samsung Smart TV, Windows, Xbox, mobile and tablet devices.

About Cinedigm

Cinedigm (NASDAQ: CIDM) is a leading independent content distributor in the United States, with direct relationships with over 60,000 physical retail storefronts and digital platforms, including Wal-Mart, Target, iTunes, Netflix, and Amazon, as well as the national Video on Demand platform on cable television. The companys library of over 52,000 films and TV episodes encompasses award-winning documentaries from Docurama Films®, next-gen Indies from Flatiron Film Company®, acclaimed independent films and festival picks through partnerships with the Sundance Institute and Tribeca Films and a wide range of content from brand name suppliers, including National Geographic, Discovery, Scholastic, NFL, Shout Factory, Hallmark, The Jim Henson Company and more.

About Wizard World

Wizard World (OTCBB: WIZD) produces Comic Cons and pop culture conventions across North America that celebrate the best in pop-fi, pop culture, movies, television, cosplay, comics, graphic novels, toys, video gaming, sci-fi, gaming, original art, collectibles, contests and more. A first-class lineup of topical programming takes place at each event, with celebrity Q&A’s, the Wizard World Film Festival, comics-themed sessions, costume contests, movie screenings, evening parties and more. Wizard World also produces socialcon featuring social media stars and will be launching CONtv, a digital media channel in partnership with leading independent content distributor Cinedigm.

About Pop Quiz Entertainment

Pop Quiz Entertainment develops and produces experiential events and branded entertainment platforms for network, cable, syndicated and online distribution, as well as live audiences across the nation. Pop Quiz Entertainment is the media and production division of Rising Tide Sports & Entertainment Group, with offices in Greenville, South Carolina and Delray Beach, Florida. Pop Quiz Entertainment is currently producing several shows, for live and broadcast audiences, including: Last Fan Standing,” “Quest ForThe Best: The Armed Forces Trivia Challenge, Hasbro Live,and Match Play.

The 2015 Wizard World schedule is available at: wizd.me/PRSchedule2015.

Meet Michael Golden, Some Portland Trail Blazers, and More at Wizard World Portland 2015

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Press Release:

MICHAEL GOLDEN MEETS THE TRAIL BLAZERS!

(A Comic Con Night to Remember)

PORTLAND, OR – Call it a little “February” Madness, but with the Wizard Portland Comic Con approaching like a full court press, the area’s leading pop culture show isn’t letting any lead up time idle, tapping slam dunk artist Michael Golden (“Fantastic Four,” “Deadpool”) as the shooter creating an amazing art piece featuring five of the Portland Trail Blazers most recognizable players.  

This combination of the all star talent turned into a great promotion for both Wizard and the Trail Blazers, with 20,000 copies of the Golden poster printed and  given to all attendees of the Miami Heat vs. Portland Trail Blazers game Thursday 1/8/15!

The five players dominating the Portland skyline are: holding the W, Nicolas Batum; holding the moon, Wesley Matthews; holding Rip City, Robin Lopez; holding the Earth, LaMarcus Aldridge; holding Trail Blazers, Damian Lillard.

It was all part of Comic Con Night at the Trail Blazers game, as professional cosplayers were roaming the stands and cheering the Trail Blazers on with the fans, as they went on to beat the Heat 99-83. 

But the shot clock hasn’t timed out on the fun!

Along with the artist of this exclusive piece, Michael Golden—who will be at the Wizard Portland show to sign the poster for those 20K fans who received one—all those attending Wizard Portland Comic Con can meet a variety of amazing talent, including Punisher artist Mike Zeck, writer/editor Renee Witterstaetter (of “She-Hulk” and “Guardians of the Galaxy” comics), actors such as Stephen Amell from “Arrow,” Bruce Campbell from “Evil Dead,” and a number of “The Walking Dead” cast members including  Michael Rooker (also in the film, “Guardians of the Galaxy”).

In addition, fans can also meet some of the Trail Blazers at Wizard World Comic Con Portland. And again, get those posters signed! 

Now that’s a scoring opportunity!

The show takes place January 23-25. For more details visit:   http://www.wizardworld.com/portland.html

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